Admissions
Home > Academic Catalog > 2011-13 Academic Catalog > Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions




ART (top)

ART 1001: Drawing from the Environment
Drawing from the Environment is a field-based studio course introducing students to observational drawing. Landscape, constructed forms, and natural forms will form the basis for developing observational skills while providing a foundation for personal imagery.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 1002: Drawing from the Human Form
The basis for this beginning drawing course begins with an understanding of the human figure, its anatomy and underlying structure. Students will use the figure as a means to develop observational skills and personal imagery.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 1015: Art Foundations
Foundations in Studio Art is an introduction to the Elements of Design and Composition where students will explore creative possibilities in most of the media areas available at the college. The 2-D and 3-D design core will involve students in creative challenges geared toward understanding the elements of art and art making. This experience allows a student to explore concepts and build skills that apply to contemporary art practice in a variety of media. Media will be chosen to approximate an equal number of projects utilizing 2-D and 3-D concepts.
3 credits

ART 2021: Introduction to Painting
This course is an introduction to the materials and vocabulary of the painting process. Students will be working in oil and/or acrylic painting media. Prerequisites: ART 1001: Drawing from the Environment and ART 1002: Drawing from the Human Form, or permission of the instructor based upon portfolio review.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work each week
3 credits


ART 2037: Ceramics I: Hand-building
Hand-building provides technical and aesthetic skill development through clay-working techniques such as pinch, coil, and slab. Local clay and glazes from indigenous sources may be used. Firing methods including the use of electric, gas, pit, and raku kilns may be explored. Through these tools and techniques students will gain familiarity with a variety of processes and produce a body of fired work, which demonstrates well-developed skills and concepts. Lectures, videos, demonstrations, and critiques support individual instruction, studio work, and a historical overview.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work each week
3 credits


ART 2045/3045/4045: Figure Studio: 2-D
Figure Studio is an advanced level course that provides opportunities for students to study from the life model and translate their ideas in a wide variety of media. Students will develop a further understanding of anatomy, figure movement, the ways that the figure might define and shape space, and the potential of the figure as an expressive compositional element. Prerequisite: ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form, and at least one other 2000 level studio course. Course may be repeated for credit at 3000 and 4000 level.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART/CMJ 2055: Graphic Communication
Theory, graphic design, and publishing processes for print, multimedia, and interactive publications form the basis of this course. Focus includes integration of text and imagery, analysis of audience interaction with media, and role of media design in cultural change and values. Student projects feature the planning and publishing of a comprehensive portfolio of media projects: communications portfolios will show enhanced focus in text applications, and arts portfolios will demonstrate concentration in traditional design and layout skills.
3 credits

ART 2061: Photography: Analog Media Students will learn to use their own 35mm manually operated SLR camera, process black and white film, and use the enlarger to make their own custom prints. Emphasis will be on exploring the potential of the photograph as an expressive-interpretive medium. A 35mm camera that can be manually operated with separate controls for aperture and shutter speed is required. Students will be responsible for some of their own film and paper.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work
3 credits


ART 2093: Stone and Wood Carving
This course will introduce all the techniques and tools necessary for basic stone carving. Student will choose a marble block to carve, and will design their own form. Harmonious integration of materials will be incorporated. Instruction will include an introduction to geology and properties of carvable stone, drilling and splitting stone, roughing-out of forms using pitching tools and point chisels, refining the form using tooth and flat chisels, texturing and polishing. The course is conducted at the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center (CSSC) in West Rutland, VT. Use of all CSSC tools and equipment, and a moderate amount of marble are included in the studio fee for the course. Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work
3 credits


ART 3009/4009: Studio Seminar in Drawing
Special topics courses in drawing assume a general competency and literacy in drawing. Topic areas may have a conceptual, technical or historical basis. Students may take this course more than once when a different subtitle is used. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment and ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3012: Printmaking
Emphasizes relief printing such as woodblock and lino prints, dry-point and mono-prints as a method of developing personal imagery. Studio fee established yearly. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment and ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work
3 credits


ART 3015: Ceramics II: Wheel Throwing
Students will be exposed to basic and intermediate throwing techniques and forms through demonstrations, research, videos and practice. Glazes will be developed from raw materials and tested, and students will learn efficient processes of firing electric and gas kilns. A journal of techniques, methods and ideas will be required. Emphasis will be on function and form. Prerequisite: ART 2037 Ceramics I: Hand-building or permission of instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits

ART/SOC 3016: Asian Art
The course represents an overview, across the ages, of how various oriental religions and cultures transformed their artistic impulses into distinctive forms of aesthetic expression. The course will explore not only painting, but also sculpture, architecture, and everyday (antique) objects. Historical, sociological, and anthropological insights will be applied to interpret common and divergent styles of art. Prerequisites: at least one course in Sociology/Anthropology, Art, or Asian Studies, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

ART 3020/4020: Ceramics III: Low-fire Techniques
This course focuses on the use of special clays and glazes formulated for use in low temperature firings. Low-fire techniques allow for a wide range of possibilities for the development of surface and color that are not easily obtained using high fire methods. Hand building and wheel throwing techniques may be used to create work that explores form, function, and concept within the rich palette of low fire glazes and clays. Majolica, China painting, decals, and terra sigilatta are some of the surfacing techniques that may be addressed. Work may be fired in electric, gas, raku, and pit kilns. Prerequisite: ART 2037 Ceramics I: Hand-Building and ART 3015 Ceramics II: Wheel Throwing.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits

ART 3021: Figure Studio: 3-D
Following a tradition thousands of years old, students will learn to construct complete and partial figures and portrait heads from life, using the medium of clay. Sculptural modeling will be based on careful observation of the natural form. The student’s work will be considered as a historical motif as well as an exercise in seeing and a venue for personal expression. Castings may be made of appropriate models. Models, armatures, sculpture stands, plaster and latex are provided, but students must purchase tools and clay. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment, ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form, and ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art, or with the permission of the instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3027/4027: Studio Seminar in Painting
Instructors may propose courses under this heading which focus upon particular areas of interest. These may include traditional and alternative media such as Watercolor, Egg Tempera, Encaustic, Fresco, Synthetic Painting Media and Airbrush. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment, ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form, ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art, and ART 2021 Intro to Painting or with the permission of the instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3032: Intermediate Painting
Painting at the intermediate level will develop the student’s understanding of the visual language of painting, as well as a sense of one’s own individuality as expressed in their art. Students will work on both group assignments and individualized projects designed to suit individual needs. Prerequisite: ART 2021 Intro to Painting.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits

ART 3047/4047: Studio Seminar in Sculpture
Topics in sculpture may focus on a particular material or subject area or both. Sculpture addresses ideas of space and volume. Courses in the subject area may involve environmental, installation, specific audience/space or others. Media may be direct carving in wood or stone, assemblage and found objects, welding, casting, or metals. Pre-requisite: ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art, and one other 3D course at the 2000 level or permission of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when it is offered under a different subtitle.
Studio fees established yearly.
3 credits

ART 3049: Environmental Sculpture
This course focuses on the creation of sculpture that addresses a variety of ideas about how we affect and are affected by our environment. The history and evolution of environmental sculpture and other contemporary art movements will be presented as a foundation for the development of works that may explore the following topics: earth works, natural materials, found objects, installation, and collaborative projects. Through these investigations students will use their pieces to communicate new and significant ideas about the world around them. The creation of project proposals and designs will be critical in the development of longer-term projects. Demonstrations, presentations, videos, critiques and field trips will be used to explore a wide range of techniques and ideas. Prerequisite: 3-D experience at or above the 2000 level or permission of instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3051: Illustration
Students in Illustration will learn to visually interpret and communicate the written word through a variety of black-and-white and color media. Computer-based programs will be an area of focus in addition to traditional media. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment or ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form, ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work
3 credits


ART 3057/4057: Studio Seminar in Design
Design seeks to understand the way various elements are planned, structured, or composed in order to accomplish an aesthetic, communicative or functional purpose. Topics in Design may include specialized courses in environmental design; landscape, furniture, or architectural principles, or even display, theatrical, packaging, product, web or graphic design. Topics may also include courses related to special areas of design theory such as media and color use. Prerequisite: ART 2055 Graphic Communication or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

ART 3061/4061: Studio Seminar in Photography
Topics in Photography offers the student who has a basic understanding of photography an opportunity to take courses in specialized areas of interest such as studio lighting, figure or portrait photography, or in areas with a special technical focus including such things as large format photography, digital photography, or special darkroom techniques. Studio fee established yearly. Prerequisite: ART 2061 Photography: Analog Media.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3062: Digital Photography
Students will learn to use their own Digital SLR camera, to record images for digital translation, manipulation, or enhancement. Field images will then be transferred to the computer, where instruction in standard image-manipulating programs such as PhotoShop will allow students to make their own custom prints. The course will continue to expand the visual literacy of photography as an expressive-interpretative medium. A survey of photographic applications in popular media such as fine art photography, print journalism, desktop publishing and design for web page publishing will also be integral to the classroom experience. Prerequisite: ART 2061 Photography: Analog Media.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 3067/4067: Studio Seminar in Printmaking
Printmaking assumes a general competency and literacy in drawing. Topic areas may have a conceptual, technical, or historical basis. Students may take this course more than once when a different subtitle is used. Studio fee established yearly. Prerequisite: ART 3012 Printmaking
4 studio hours
6-10 hours independent work
3 credits


ART 4013: Internship
The art department internship is a requirement for the B.F.A. degree. The Internship is an off-campus activity involving either the development of an independent body of studio work or a practical on-the-job work experience in a selected area of concentration. Commitment includes a negotiated number of hours per week and regular evaluation by a department internship advisor. Students should see their advisor at least two months in advance to receive approval to undertake the internship. The internship can be undertaken after the completion of the junior year unless otherwise arranged and requires that a contract be agreed to by the student, the faculty internship advisor, and the off-campus supervisor. If the student elects to do the internship outside of the normal semester calendar then the fees for the internship will be based upon the per credit rate in effect during that academic year. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, a 2.0 minimum overall grade point average, and a 2.5 grade point average in the major.
240 hours: 6 credits
360 hours: 9 credits


ART 4015/4016/4017Senior Exhibition/Presentation & Portfolio
This course prepares students to further their careers as working artists upon completion of their studies at GMC. Focus will be placed on the business aspects of a career as a practicing artist through the exploration of topics including: graduate school research and applications, photographic documentation of artwork, marketing, career opportunities, the gallery system, grant applications, taxes, contracts, and copyright. A major component of the course is the required senior exhibition/presentation. During this phase of the course students will select from work completed during their study at Green Mountain College, then organize and display a refined body of work to the public in a professional manner. They will also be required to document their work photographically and prepare a portfolio and resume for presentation to the faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing, a 2.0 minimum overall GPA, and a 2.75 GPA in the major.
2 hour seminar each week (fall) and minimum 30 hours Senior Show preparation: 4 credits
Students who are scheduling their senior exhibition for spring semester will take:
Senior Exhibition/Presentation &Portfolio as ART 4016 in the fall: 2 credits
Senior Exhibition/Presentation &Portfolio as ART 4017 in the spring: 2 credits

ART 4031: Advanced Painting
Students in advanced painting will work closely with the instructor to develop an individualized program of study. Seminars and critiques will bring students together to help them assess the historical context of their work and to evaluate their individual progress. Prerequisite: ART 1001 Drawing from the Environment, ART 1002 Drawing from the Human Form, or with the permission of the instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 4034: Ceramic Sculpture
Visual imagery, design, and exploration of ideas within the context of the language of ceramics constitute the backbone of this course. Hand-building and wheel throwing techniques will be explored in conjunction with more advanced techniques including mold making, slip-casting, the use of paper clay, and special firing processes. These methods will serve as the basis for the conceptual development of works informed by the history of ceramics. Work may vary dramatically in size from the small-scale to the large-scale, and may address form, function, and idea. Prerequisite: ART 1015 Foundations in Studio Art, ART 2037 Ceramics I and ART 3015 Ceramics II, or permission of instructor.
Studio fee established yearly.
4 studio hours
6-10 hours of independent work each week
3 credits


ART 2001: Art History I: Paleolithic through Romanesque
A survey of world architecture, sculpture, painting and applied arts from Paleolithic through Romanesque. The course will address the major artistic achievements of early world civilizations as it explores the cultural values and beliefs in historic contexts.
3 credits

ART 2002: Art History II: Gothic through Dada
A survey of world architecture, sculpture, painting and applied arts from Gothic through Dada and into the 20th century. The course will address the major artistic achievements within individual cultures as it continues survey of historic contexts.
3 credits

ART 4005: Special Topics in History & Theory
Special topic courses in History and Theory will afford students an opportunity to explore content areas outside traditional survey limits. Presentation may focus on areas such as Issues in Contemporary Art, Art and Women Artists, Art in Public Places, Nature in Art. Students may take this course more than once when a different subtitle is used. Prerequisites: ART 2001 Art History I or ART 2002 Art History II or permission of instructor.
3 class hours
3 credits


ART 4022: Issues in Art
Issues in Art is primarily a lecture/seminar focusing on current issues in the art world. Core to the course will be the relationship between the artist and society from the Dada and Surrealist artists of the 1930s and 1940s to the current art scene. Course projects will include research on contemporary issues as well as studio projects that are aimed to provide the student with hands-on applications of ideas under discussion. Prerequisite: ART 2001 Art History I or ART 2002 Art History II or permission of instructor.
3 class hours
3 credits



BIO (top)

BIO 1000: First Year Seminar
The first year seminar is a reading seminar that is offered each fall. Texts and topics change each year. All freshmen interested in the biology major should enroll in this course.
1 class hour
1 credit


BIO 1034: From Fins to Fingers: Vertebrate Natural History and Evolution
This course is an introduction to evolutionary theory, the nature of science, and natural history of the region as studied through the case of the vertebrates. In this course students will learn the history and natural history of the regional vertebrate fauna, the theory and methodology of evolutionary biology using vertebrates as an example, and explore the nature of science through the example of evolution. This course serves as an introduction to evolution and the nature of science. This is a fall semester introductory biology course.
3 class hours 2 laboratory hours weekly
4 credits

BIO 1035: Disease and Disorder: History, Humans, and Hope
This course travels through history, from the discovery of cells to the current age of genomics and proteomics, highlighting major discoveries while learning about diseases and disorders that have ravaged mankind. Pressure to search for the molecular basis of disease has taught us much of what we know about how normal cells work. We explore prevailing diseases and genetic disorders, as well as look at emerging health issues as they relate to environmental toxins and the industrialized fast-food diet. Topics include biochemistry, cell structure, cell interactions, physiology, genetics, anatomy, morphology, reproduction, and development. Students conduct original research in lab. This is a spring-semester introductory biology course.
3 class hours 2 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 1036: Solar Powered Life: The Biology of Plants
Plants convert sun, water, and rock into food, habitat, and life itself. To a great extent, plants create our sense of place, from enchanted northern forest to southern live oak hammock. To see how plants work, this course examines structure and function from molecular to organismal levels of organization. Topics include biochemistry, cell structure, cell interactions, physiology, genetics, anatomy, morphology, reproduction, and development. Students conduct original research in lab. This is a spring-semester introductory biology course.
3 class hours 2 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 1037: The Four Seasons: Plant and Animal Adaptations to a Changing Environment
Have you ever wondered why maple trees lose their leaves in the fall? Or why a cold-blooded animal like a frog doesn’t freeze solid in the winter? Or how rodents that live in deserts can withstand such extremes in temperature? Plants and animals have developed an astonishing range of adaptations to the variable conditions they experience throughout the year. In this course we will study the mechanisms underlying these adaptations by examining a variety of biological topics, including biochemistry, cell structure, cell interactions, physiology, genetics, anatomy, morphology, reproduction, and development. Students conduct original research in lab. This is a spring-semester introductory biology course.
3 class hours 2 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 2005: Sophomore Seminar
The sophomore seminar is an annual reading seminar. Students are responsible for discussion facilitation and critical reading assessments. Prerequisite: BIO 1000 First Year Seminar or permission of instructor.
1 class hour
1 credit

BIO 2013/PSY 2014: Genetics of Human Behavior
Explore the fascinating genetics behind human behavior. What is the role of our genetic make-up in how we behave and interact with others? Studies in twins separated at birth and many animal models described in the primary literature will be evaluated to answer these questions. Nature and nurture will be examined since both genetic and environmental influences must be considered in behavioral analyses. Functional neuro-anatomy and topics in human neuro-psychology will be introduced throughout the course as we explore the genes involved in human behavior. This course may also be taken as PSY 2014.
3 credits

BIO 2015: Cell Biology
The principal goals of the class are to provide a historical context for present day understanding of cellular systems, while using classical experimentation to explore experimental design and data analysis. Content will include how energy is stored and used by cells, the three dimensional structure of proteins, the relationship between structure and function in proteins, and universal cell functions, specifically DNA replication, transcription and translation. In the laboratory, students will learn basic techniques commonly used in scientific laboratories including: proper use of micropipettes, microcentrifuges, preparation of stock and working solutions/buffers, generation and use of standard curves, PCR and SDS-PAGE analysis. Student projects will include creation of a 3D protein model. Prerequisite: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers and either BIO 1035 Disease and Disorder or BIO 1036 Solar Powered Life or BIO 1037 The Four Seasons, and CHE 1021 General Chemistry I.
3 class hours 3 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 2021: Field Biology
This course provides an opportunity to collect biological data in a variety of ecosystems in the northeast and apply field research methods. Emphasis will be on observation, species identification, field notes, sampling methods observational and experimental study design, mapping, data analysis, and scientific writing. Weekend field trips and overnight camping are required.
2 class hours 4 laboratory hours
3 credits

BIO 2023: Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy is the study of anatomical features that make us uniquely human, as well as those connecting us to all other animal species. This course will employ the regional approach utilized in a traditional medical school environment; we will explore the interrelation of systems from the cellular to organism level through understanding the morphology. Laboratory work will involve dissection of the cat in addition to study of histological and skeletal specimens. Prerequisites: Any 1000-level biology course with lab.
4 credits

BIO 2025: Ecology
The course is the study of the interactions of organisms with their environment through application of biology, chemistry, and mathematics. Referring to current and classical research, lectures introduce the sub-disciplines of ecology, including physiological, behavioral, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape ecology. Labs and field trips emphasize observation, scientific method, sampling methods, problem solving, data analysis, and report writing. Prerequisite: Any laboratory course and Level 3 or higher math proficiency.
3 class hours 2 laboratory hours alternate weeks
4 credits

BIO 3005: Junior Seminar
In this course, students will actively reflect upon their own educational experience, identify gaps in personal knowledge and skill areas, create plans for addressing these gaps prior to graduation, and explore career options. The latter will include building a resume, investigating the type of careers available to biology majors, choosing graduate schools they wish to apply for and understanding what they will need to do for successful applications. Students are required to compile their own professional electronic portfolios. Student self-assessments will be used by the biology faculty when conducting the Junior Year Review. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
1 class hour
1 credit

BIO 3011: Special Topics
Selected topics in biology presented on a one-time or occasional basis. Credit varies depending upon topic and instructor. Topics in Organismal Biology BIO 3012 This course is an in-depth exploration of organismal biology from taxonomic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives. The credits are repeatable under different topics, which include Ichthyology, Ornithology, Entomology, and Mammalogy. Each of these is offered on approximately a 3-year rotation subject to demand. The general course structure will include a study of the classification, systematics, evolutionary history, life histories, behavior, and ecology of the taxon in question with particular emphasis on species of the northeast. Laboratory includes in-residence work and extended field trips that focus on field identification and sampling/study techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers.
4 credits

BIO 3012: Topics in Organismal Biology
This course is an in-depth exploration of organismal biology from taxonomic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives. The credits are repeatable under different topics, which include Ichthyology, Ornithology, Entomology, and Mammalogy. Each of these is offered on approximately a 3-year rotation subject to demand. The general course structure will include a study of the classification, systematics, evolutionary history, life histories, behavior, and ecology of the taxon in question with particular emphasis on species of the northeast. Laboratory includes in-residence work and extended field trips that focus on field identification and sampling/study techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers.
4 credits

BIO 3013: Botany
An introduction to plant biology, including taxonomy, the role of plants in ecosystems, and the cultivation and use of plants by people. In the field, students collect and identify local flora. Lab and garden exercises emphasize plant morphology and evolution, plant ecology, plant collections, and horticultural methods. Prerequisite: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers or permission of instructor.
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 3019: Genetics
This upper division course explores the transmission of genes from one generation to the next, the nature of mutations, gene function and regulation, and the genetics of populations. There will be a strong emphasis on models of human disease. Students will be required to present a final seminar on a genetic disorder and review the primary literature in a chosen area of interest. The laboratory will stress sterile technique and introduce students to standard technologies, such as DNA isolation and PCR. Prerequisites: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers or BIO 1035 Disease and Disorder required. BIO 2015 Cell Biology highly recommended.
3 class hours
3 credits

BIO 3021: Conservation Biology
Explores how ecological knowledge can be brought to bear to protect diverse ecosystems, maintain viable populations of native species, and perpetuate ecological and evolutionary processes. Students will investigate scientific uncertainty and research priorities. Case studies will be used to investigate how to predict the effects of habitat fragmentation, resource depletion and pollution, habitat loss, and other human effects. Biology will be applied to ecosystem management, landscape design, and regional conservation planning. Prerequisites: BIO 2025 Ecology or permission of instructor.
3 class hours
3 credits

BIO 3023: Vertebrate Population Monitoring
Course Description: Covers methods to obtain reliable estimates of population size and survival, with an emphasis on the relationship between scientific hypothesis testing and management of wildlife populations. This course consists of a mix of lecture, computer labs, and biodiversity surveys on the GMC campus. Students will come away from this course with an overview of both field methods and standard data analysis tools and software for estimating these important parameters. Prerequisite: BIO 2025 Ecology and MAT 1015 Introduction to Statistics, or permission of instructor.
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
4 credits

BIO 3025: Advanced Topics in Ecology
This course is an in-depth investigation of subdisciplines within ecology. The topics will vary and include Forest Ecology, Plant Ecology, and Aquatic Ecology. Students will investigate the interaction of organisms and their environment at multiple spatial scales including organismal, population, community, ecosystem and landscape ecology. The emphasis will be on both theoretical concepts and applied issues including management, conservation and restoration. Reading will come from the primary and secondary literature. Prerequisites: BIO 2025 Ecology and MAT 1015 Intro to Statistics.
3 class hours
3 credits

BIO 3027: Forest Ecology and Management
An ecological approach to understanding forest structure and function and the effects of management activities on forest ecosystems. The course examines how forests are observed and measured, and how forest data can be used by the scientist or forester or independent land manager to make land use sustainable. Emphasis will be on both theoretical concepts and their applications in management situations. Prerequisite: BIO 2025 Ecology.
3 class hours
3 credits

BIO 3072: Biology Field Trip
A study of the ecology of a region during an extended period of time in the field, focusing on comparisons of natural history, plant and animal adaptations, ecology, and conservation biology in a variety of ecosystems. Methods emphasize field observation, rapid assessment of ecosystems, and individual observational research by each student. Destinations, duration, and credit will vary. Prerequisite: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers or permission of instructor.
4-day field trip with 5 class hours 1 credit
9-day field trip with 14 class hours 3 credits
3-week field trip with 14 class hours 6 credits

BIO 3073: Animal Behavior
An ethological approach to the study of animals, this course includes an examination of the physiological, developmental, and evolutionary bases of behavior. Topics include sensation, motivation, learning, instinct, communication, social behavior in an evolutionary context. Prerequisite: One of the following: BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers, or BIO 2025 Ecology.
3 credits

BIO 4001: Senior Seminar
In this seminar course students will be expected to apply the theory and knowledge from other courses in the sciences to an area of interest within biology. The course will be structured like a graduate seminar course and consist of an exploration or primary literature within one area of biology. When possible, speakers will be brought to campus and students may travel to hear scientists present their research. Prerequisite: BIO 2005 Sophomore Seminar or BIO 3005 Junior Seminar.
1 class hour
1 credit

BIO 4003: Evolution
This course brings together prevailing knowledge, ideas, and controversies about and within the field of evolutionary biology. It is an in-depth examination of topics to which many biology students will have been introduced, but have not explored. These include historical and philosophical issues, origin and early development of life, general features in evolution of major life forms, use of systematics and the influence of molecular tools, the range of mechanisms thought to underlie evolutionary change, and current findings in human evolution. The laboratory will be focused around a population genetic problem for which the class will gather and analyze molecular data, with the goal of producing a publishable scientific study. Prerequisites: either BIO 1034 From Fins to Fingers or BIO 1035 Disease and Disorder or BIO 1036 Solar Powered Life and CHE 1021 General Chemistry I or permission of the instructor.
4 credits

BIO/CHE 4015: Biochemistry
This upper division course will greatly enhance detailed understanding of important biological pathways and concepts introduced in general biology and chemistry. Topics will include signal transduction, enzyme structure and function, metabolism and bioenergetics, electron protein structure and function. Students will become proficient with techniques routinely employed in biological research laboratories. Students also enroll in BIO 4016 Microarray, which will constitute a portion of the laboratory component of this course. Prerequisites: either BIO 1035 Disease and Disorder or BIO 1036 Solar Powered Life, CHE 1022 General Chemistry II, C or better in BIO 2015 Cell Biology.
3 class hours
3 credits

BIO/CHE 4016: Microarray
This laboratory accompanies BIO 4015 and should be taken concomitantly with Biochemistry. In this course, students will use yeast as a model system to explore how gene expression is changed after exposure to a common environmental contaminant. Students will learn a variety of standard as well as advanced laboratory techniques. Weekly lectures will complement the hands-on laboratory portion to effectively couple theory with practice. Students will be taken through basic microarray data analysis procedures to generate lists of genes, which are up or down regulated in response to the environmental contaminant. GMC student-derived data will be added to the statewide database compiling these findings. Prerequisite: BIO 2015 Cell Biology or permission of instructor.
4 hour laboratories meet 7 times
1 credit

BIO 4017: Bioinformatics BIO
The ability to manipulate organisms genetically has been revolutionized in the last ten years. Biological information produced by this revolution is represented in many forms: sequence data, structural data, and functional data. These data can often be accessed and interpreted only with the help of computers. Data Mining is now an established tool for predicting structure and understanding function in genomics and proteomics. It is becoming impossible for molecular biologists and biochemists to do research without the aid of computer based tools. The advent of computational biology also offers new course is an introduction to the concepts, and the principal data bases of bioinformatics and structural biology/chemistry. This course should enable students to access and analyze sequence and structure data, create and edit images of molecules, and present results in several formats. Prerequisite: BIO 2015 Cell Biology.
1 credit

BIO 4019: Proteomics
The goal of the Proteomics course is to expose undergraduates to proteomics technology using hands-on laboratory experiences. Students will learn about this cutting edge technology and gain new skills that we believe will help them with their future scientific careers. In this course, students will learn how protein expression in yeast is changed after exposure to oxidative stress or an environmental toxin. Total protein is then harvested and prepared for 2D gel analysis. Proteins with differential expression will be isolated from the 2D gel and prepared for Mass Spectrometry at the UVM Proteomics Core Facility. The data is processed and students will examine their results and use bioinformatics tools to further understand the biological implications of the results. Prerequisite: BIO 2015 Cell Biology.
1 credit

BIO/EDU 4035: Content for Secondary Science Teachers
This course is an opportunity for students to participate in environmental education fieldwork. Students will be required to complete a 120-hour work experience under the direction of a qualified environmental education professional. Written work related to this experience will be required. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
4 credits

BIO 4053 Research in Biology BIO 4053
This course allows advanced students to carry out independent research under the guidance of a biology faculty member. Prerequisite: Completion of core classes and junior standing.
1-3 credits

BIO 4099: Honors Thesis in Biology
This course involves individualized research under the guidance of a member of the Biology faculty, the honors advisor. The student with his/her honors advisor will decide upon the particular goal of the research. To be eligible, a student must have been invited into departmental honors and produced a research proposal that is accepted by the department in the semester prior to beginning the thesis research. The student will produce an honors thesis that will be defended in a public presentation. Prerequisite: A successful petition for honors in biology.
3 credits

BIO 4093: Teaching Practicum in Biology
The teaching practicum is intended to give the student experience in the array of skills required to teach a course. The student attends and participates in a course, does supervised course instruction, holds review sessions and develops a formal teaching portfolio. Together with the course instructor the student learns and practices teaching skills. Prerequisite: Junior standing, GPA of 3.5 in Biology, 3.0 overall.
3 credits



BUS (top)

BUS 1073: Contemporary Business
This course examines the nature of contemporary business. Students are introduced to foundational concepts of management, leadership, marketing, accounting, finance, operations, and human resources, among others. Through a combination of case studies, readings, guest speakers, and projects, students will learn about key business functions, governance, ethics, and sustainability as sources of competitive advantage.
3 credits

BUS 1125: Marketing
Market performance proves that organizations that understand and apply customer-centric marketing are more likely to achieve long-term success. This interactive course provides students with an overview of the marketing process and its principles including environmental scanning and market research, branding, product development, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Sustainable marketing concepts and real life case studies will be emphasized.
3 credits

BUS 2001: Financial & Managerial Accounting
This course introduces students to the principles, concepts, and applications of financial and managerial accounting. The first part of the course introduces accounting concepts and focuses on how external users of financial, social, and environmental information interpret reports when evaluating an organization. The second part of the course examines the main concepts underpinning managerial accounting. Topics include the balanced scorecard and other new measures of performance, financial statements, costing and budgeting.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business
3 credits

BUS 2002: Managerial Accounting
This course introduces students to the principles, concepts, applications and processes of managerial accounting, and focuses on how internal users apply accounting tools and information to aid internal planning, coordinating and controlling the activities of an organization. Topics include management accounting systems, cost behavior, product costing, business overhead costs, budgeting, the preparation of schedules and budgeted statements, and variance analysis.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business and BUS 2001 Financial and Managerial Accounting.
3 credits

BUS 2045: New Venture Creation & Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurship is the creation of a new venture as well as a growing trend in existing organizations both nationally and internationally. This course will explore the key drivers in the growth of entrepreneurship and the factors that contribute to entrepreneurial success and failure. Students will have the opportunity to explore these concepts through the creation of their own new venture concept and self-reflection if they are willing to do what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.
3 credits

BUS 2063: Human Resources Management
This course explores the human resource management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. The course will cover such subjects as the selection process, employee motivation, talent development, employment law, labor relations, compensation, and performance management. Topics also include human resources’ role in maintaining organizational cultures that emphasize sustainability to attract, retain, and motivate employees.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business
3 credits

BUS 3000: Junior Seminar
In this course students assess their progress toward achieving the objectives of the sustainable business major. In addition, students prepare a detailed plan to complete a field experience in an off-campus organization related to the student’s personal and professional objectives. Lastly, students explore career options and examine a specific industry in which they are interested. Students prepare a self-assessment in which they reflect upon their educational experience, identify gaps, and create a plan for addressing these gaps prior to graduation. Student self-assessments will be used by the sustainable business faculty to complete a junior year review of each student. This course is open to declared sustainable business majors.
Prerequisites: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business and Junior standing, or permission from the instructor.
3 credits

BUS 3008: Finance
This course introduces students to the principles, concepts, and applications of financial management. Concepts are illustrated with examples based on personal, business and non-profit organization decisions using. The course is intended for students who are interested in learning the tools and techniques of finance and how to apply them. Topics include: Financing new ventures; assessing projects; managing conflicts among stakeholders; working capital management; managing lenders and investors; multiple stakeholder performance measurement; forecasting; and ethics.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business and MAT 1015 Introduction to Statistics.
3 credits

BUS 3040: Supply Chain & Operations Management
This course's objective is to provide the student with an understanding of the operations function and the basic skills necessary to critically analyze and evaluate a firm's operating performance and practices. Through a combination of case studies, readings, simulations, video and projects, students will learn how a firm's technology, processes, relationships and management system can enable it to more effectively serve its markets in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business.
3 credits

BUS 3050: Legal & Ethical Environment of Business
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal environment of business and nonprofit organizations. Using readings, video case studies, and simulations, students learn how laws have a real-world impact on how organizations can operate successfully. Topics include business ethics and social responsibility; alternative dispute resolution; contracts; torts; employment law; agency law; and environmental law.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business and BUS 2063 Human Resource Management.
3 credits

BUS 3060: Transformational Leadership
This course provides students with management and leadership skills and knowledge that are critically important to achieve organizational goals. Students assess their leadership style and preferences throughout the course and design an individualized leadership development plan based on professional and personal goals. Starting with the basic management functions of planning, organizing, control, students learn foundational concepts of leadership and how to apply them.
Prerequisite: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business
3 credits

BUS 4005: Special Topics in Business
This is an advanced business reading and/or research course, which can be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.
3 credits

BUS 4015: Management Internship
Under the guidance of a faculty advisor who will supervise, monitor, and evaluate the internship, a student can receive up to 6 credits for an internship with a private company, non-profit organization, or a government agency.
3-6 credits

BUS 4022: Business Strategy and Sustainability Capstone
In this course students integrate knowledge gained in other program courses to develop effective organizational strategy. This course provides students with an opportunity to synthesize business functional content to develop integrated business strategy, by analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating case study situations. In addition, students will learn to discuss and justify strategic plan recommendations and assumptions, as well to prioritize goals and determine the feasibility of achieving these goals. Lastly, students evaluate the field experience in an off-campus organization that was planned in the junior seminar.
Prerequisites: BUS 3000 Junior Seminar and completion of 120 hours of practical experience of approved, documented work
3 credits

BUS 4040: Strategic Management
This course presents tools, concepts, and perspectives for analyzing competitive strategies and decisions, and developing and managing strategies for sustainable competitive advantage. Strategic management is concerned with management of the overall direction of an organization rather than individual functions, such as finance or marketing. Strategic management is about analyzing the external environment and internal organizational capabilities so that an entity can develop an advantageous market positioning and succeed. Emphasis will be placed on comparing and contrasting “traditional” competitive strategies based on shareholder returns with strategies for sustainability based on stakeholder interests.
Prerequisites: BUS 1073 Contemporary Business and Junior Standing.
3 credits

BUS 4045: Launching A New Venture: Readying Your Market Entrance
Launching New Ventures prepares students to start new initiatives—focusing on the process and activities required before a new venture can launch, including market research, business plan preparation, and financing, among others. This advanced course uses real-world case studies to examine the process of recognizing an opportunity; testing a business concept; and implementing a ready-for-market business plan.
Prerequisites: BUS 1125 Marketing and BUS 2001 Financial & Managerial Accounting; or BUS 2045 New Venture Creation & Entrepreneurship, or permission of instructor.
3 credits



 

CHE (top)

CHE 1021: General Chemistry I
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of chemistry and emphasizes the use of basic principles of chemistry to understand the complexities of the natural and biological world. Topics include atoms, molecules, chemical stoichiometry, kinetic and molecular theory, gas laws, electronic structure of the atom, polarity, ionic and covalent bonding; the states of matter, properties of solutions, polymers, energy, nuclear processes and organic compounds. Laboratories focus on environmental topics related to water and include field trips as well as wet and instrumental methods of analysis.
3 class hours 4 laboratory hours alternate weeks 4 credits

CHE 1022: General Chemistry II
This course expands and enhances the topics covered in CHE 1021 primarily by integrating mathematical principles. Topics include advanced treatment of solutions, energy, redox, and equilibrium. Laboratories focus on understanding energy production and usage in the environment, and on the application of analytical instrumentation for chemical analysis. Prerequisite: CHE 1021 General Chemistry I.
3 class hours 4 laboratory hours alternate weeks 4 credits

CHE 2021: Organic Chemistry I
Organic chemistry investigates fundamental concepts of organic molecules including structure, energy relationships, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopy. It emphasizes oral and written communication, critical thinking and interpretation of real-world scenarios. The laboratory promotes the understanding of organic and environmental chemistry through the use of specialized techniques and instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHE 1021 General Chemistry I.
3 class hours 4 laboratory hours alternate weeks 4 credits

CHE 2022: Organic Chemistry II
This course introduces advanced concepts of organic chemistry while emphasizing problem solving and reasoning skills. Topics include investigation of a variety of organic compounds, advanced reaction mechanisms, aromaticity, free radical reactions, polymers, kinetics, energy changes and the chemical basis for biological transformations of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. This class highlights the use of higher order thinking skills to interpret and analyze chemical situations. The laboratory emphasizes green and environmental chemistry through the use of organic techniques. Prerequisite: CHE 2021 Organic Chemistry I.
3 class hours 4 laboratory hours alternate weeks 4 credits

CHE 3005: The Chemistry of Sustainability
This course investigates the natural chemistry of the environment, the interactions of man-made chemicals with the environment, and the processes used to lessen the adverse effects of wastes and byproducts. The course seeks to establish an understanding of the relationships between basic chemical principles and complex natural systems including air, water, watersheds, soils and living organisms. Using this foundation the course then examines the effects of anthropogenic sources of pollution and current methods of pollutant amelioration. Prerequisites: CHE 1021 General Chemistry I.
3 credits

CHE 3021: Green Chemistry
This advanced chemistry course will introduce students to the twelve guiding principles of green chemistry. Students will evaluate the effect of chemicals and chemical production on human health. Topics covered in detail will include real world cases that have been recognized nationally through the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. Students will participate in an on-campus poster session highlighting green chemistry in use. The laboratory component will stress practices of green chemistry, including atom economy, making biodiesel, green waste, and waste reduction. Prerequisite: CHE 1021 General Chemistry I.
3 credits

CHE 3012/4012: Special Topics
Special topics in chemistry presented on a one time or occasional basis. Credit and prerequisites vary depending on topic and instructor.
1-4 credits

CHE 3053: Research in Chemistry I
This course provides an introduction to research design, measurement, and analysis and provides a one on one opportunity for students to work with a faculty mentor on a research project.
1-3 credits

CHE/BIO 4015: Biochemistry
This upper division course will greatly enhance detailed understanding of important biological pathways and concepts introduced in general biology and chemistry. Topics will include signal transduction, enzyme structure and function, metabolism and bioenergetics, electron protein structure and function. Students will become proficient with techniques routinely employed in biological research laboratories. Students also enroll in BIO 4016 Microarray, which will constitute a portion of the laboratory component of this course. Prerequisites: either BIO 1035 Disease and Disorder or BIO 1036 Solar Powered Life, CHE 1022 General Chemistry II, C or better in BIO 2015 Cell Biology.
3 credits

CHE 4053: Research in Chemistry II
Along with a faculty mentor, students investigate a research topic at an advanced level. Prerequisites: CHE 1021 General Chemistry I and either CHE 1022 General Chemistry I or CHE 2021 Organic Chemistry I.
1-3 credits



CLC (top)

CLC 1000: Introduction to College Math
This course provides a review of basic operations with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions, as well as algebraic expressions and operations of polynomials. Ratios and proportions, percents, square roots, and sets are covered. Additional topics include factoring of polynomials, linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations, and operations with rational expressions. Functions and quadratic equations will be introduced. This class is graded on a pass/no pass basis. Credits for this courses do not count toward GMC graduation requirements. This course may be a prerequisite for other GMC required courses.
3 credits



CMJ (top)

CMJ 1011: Introduction to Mass Communication
Introduces institutions, practices, and relationships among media and society. Examines media within information and entertainment contexts, exploring dimensions of media production, content, audience, and effects. The course explores the history of media in the context of current issues faced by publishers of print, broadcast, and online media.
3 credits

CMJ 2013: Writing for Media
Students will analyze writing process and practices as they report and write for a variety of media and genres. Writing assignments will explore objective reporting, advocacy and narrative writing, and scriptwriting for a range of text, audio, and visual media. Coursework will explore community, regional, and issue-based topics as a focus for writing assignments.
3 credits

CMJ 2015: Media Convergence
Media convergence integrates audio, video, imagery, text and interactivity in a range of traditional and integrated media. Students will explore the concepts and practices of convergent media as they plan and author a range of integrated media projects. Additionally, student will research case studies to explore the history and ethics of participatory media, social networking, and the interface of the individual, culture, media, and technology. Prerequisite: None. Recommended: Familiarity with media software.
3 credits

CMJ 2025: Professional Communication
This course will explore methods of communication in professional and organizational settings, the communication needs of professional communities, and publication of professional documents and media. Case studies of organizational and civic communication processes will introduce key issues and techniques, including print and online correspondence, public presentations, and authoring public relations and advertising messages in the context of a communications campaign.
3 credits

CMJ/ART 2055: Graphic Communication
Theory, graphic design, and publishing processes for print, multimedia, and interactive publications form the basis of this course. Focus includes integration of text and imagery, analysis of audience interaction with media, and role of media design in cultural change and values. Student projects feature the planning and publishing of a comprehensive portfolio of media projects: communications portfolios will show enhanced focus in text applications, and arts portfolios will demonstrate concentration in traditional design and layout skills.
3 credits

CMJ 3007: Persuasion
In this course, students will analyze, construct, and support arguments that engage a range of specific audiences. This course will examine classical and contemporary theories of persuasive communication as practiced in politics, advocacy and social marketing,, advertising, and interpersonal relationships. Students will explore the theories, principles, and methods of persuasion; the role and function of persuasion and presentation of persuasive messages; and concepts of ethical persuasion. Prerequisites: ELA 1000 Images of Nature and ELA 1500 Voices of Community, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

CMJ 3010: Media Leadership and Ethics
Professional practices, media history, legal precedents, and case studies of communication issues in the context of the media’s role in civic leadership. This course supports the leadership staff of college and community publications as students analyze and seek resolution for ethical issues common to media. Prerequisite: Any 1000- or 2000-level Communications course.
3 credits

CMJ/EDU 3012:Environmental Interpretation and Communication
This course will explore the theories, principles, and techniques of interpreting cultural, historical, and natural resources. The course will explore relevant educational, social, psychological, and philosophical theories relevant to interpretative learning and communication. Students will synthesize and apply interpretation theory and methods, refine interpretative communication and publishing skills, and undertake independent research while working on service learning project(s).
3 credits

CMJ 3013: Communications Workshop
Focused study of media and literary works will provide models for student writing and publishing projects. Study and assessment of professional publications in various media will guide student writing and publishing projects. A rotating focus for the Communications Workshop includes Feature Writing, Creative Nonfiction, Documentary Media, Science Writing, and other genres and media. Course may be repeated with a different subtitle focus. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Recommended: CMJ 2013 Writing for Media.
3 credits

CMJ 3020: Media Advocacy and Campaigns
This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of advocacy communication in professional and grassroots settings. Students will learn to analyze and construct advocacy campaigns across evolving media formats, including textual, visual, performative and digital. Students will learn to consciously construct targeted messages for multiple audiences and distribution models. The course will utilize case studies, readings, lectures, roleplay and authorship to achieve learning objectives. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Recommended: CMJ 1011 Introduction to Mass Communication.

3 credits

CMJ 3021: Video and Media Production
This course explores technical and artistic concepts relating to video production and online media authoring. Students take part in group productions in the field and digital studio environment using a variety of production equipment. The class culminates with an individual student production.
3 credits

CMJ 3025: Environmental Communication
To communicate environmental and science policy issues, media practitioners integrate communication theory and a variety of media publishing practices to produce informational and persuasive campaigns. Students prepare case studies of environmental communication processes, including advocacy campaigns, informational and public policy reports, and objective and persuasive media reporting. With these case studies as models, workgroups will research and author an environmental communications campaign that includes assessment of scientific data and claims, risk and cost/benefit analyses, and use of media to engage an audience in a public policy process. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Recommended: CMJ 2013 Writing for Media.
3 credits

CMJ 4003:Media Seminar
Contemporary issues in media and communications, with opportunity for advanced study of media theory and analysis of professional publishing practices. Topics may include international media systems; rhetoric of environmental and cultural issues; interactive and multimedia publishing; media law and ethics; and evolving issues in public policy, science and culture. Course may be repeated with a different subtitle focus. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Recommended: CMJ 1011 Introduction to Mass Communications or HIS 2015 Mass Culture in America.
3 credits

CMJ 4010: Media Practicum
A Media Practicum may include creative and management positions in a variety of on- and off-campus media. Students will work independently and with publishing teams to manage and publish a variety of media. Professional issues and standards will be reviewed within the publication team and with the instructor. Repeatable up to 3 credits. Prerequisite: Any one of the following: CMJ 1011 Introduction to Mass Communications, CMJ 2015 Media Convergence, CMJ 2013 Writing for Media, or permission of the instructor.
1-3 credits

CMJ 4013: Professional Portfolio
Students will compile a professional portfolio that synthesizes communications coursework and supporting materials from interdisciplinary studies, independent work, and professional activities in the Media Practicum or Internship. Additionally, students will research and assess communications trends and issues that may affect their roles as participants and leaders in communications and related professions. Prerequisite: Concurrent with CMJ 4010 Media Practicum or CMJ 4015 Internship. Or permission of the instructor.
1 credit

CMJ 4015: Communications Internship
During a Communications Internship, a student will enhance skills, and develop career options through focused service with a communications professional. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, a student will arrange a period of practical experience with specific learning objectives that will add mastery to the knowledge and skills acquired in the Communications major. Evaluative reports are completed by student, advisor, and off-campus supervisor.
3 credits



DRA (top)

DRA 1002/ELA 1031: Theatre: The Audience Environment
This course provides an in-depth look at the theatre environment from an informed audience point of view. In the course, students will examine the collaborative nature of a play as a piece of “living literature” in order to identify its shape, conflicts, climax and resolution and how it is adapted to the stage. Plays will be looked at as reflections of our culture and we will question why they ultimately need to be seen and heard to be fully understood. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the components of effective playmaking and will apply these criteria to assess the effectiveness of theatrical productions, viewing both live stage performances and films. Assessments will include discussions, written responses/reviews, projects and scene presentations.
Lab fee: $60 (tickets and transportation)
3 credits

DRA 1003: Acting I
The urge to act is an instinctive and liberating pursuit. This class explores the fundamentals of stage acting through improvisation, vocal & physical theatre exercises, monologues, and scene work. We investigate the concepts of place, character, and motivation, as well as developing relaxation, sensory awareness, imagination, and working in the moment. The course culminates in a fully memorized and blocked scene presentation.
3 credits

DRA 2013: Theatre Workshop: Production & Performance
This course provides hands-on experience in various aspects of theatre production and performance. This may include activities such as acting, lighting, sound, scenery, props, costumes, stage management, promotion, etc. while working on plays presented each term. Students receive one credit for participation; there are rehearsals and work periods scheduled late afternoons and evenings. Students may register up until the third Friday of the semester without penalty.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (to be determined by audition, interview and particular production needs.)
Note: This course may be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits total. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis
1 credit

DRA 2015: Acting II
This course will examine plays from a rich variety of American and European playwrights and explore them from an actor’s point of view. Individual monologues and scenes will be rehearsed in order to discuss the playwright’s intentions through text analysis, how to break a scene into acting “beats,” a character’s motivation, and how to find the overall rhythm of a scene. This course may be taken more than once with a different subtitle. Examples: Classic American Playwrights, Acting Comedy, Modern European Playwrights, Acting Shakespeare.
Prerequisite: DRA 1003 Acting I or permission of instructor.
3 credits

DRA 3020: Fundamentals of Directing
This course provides students with the essential skills in directing a production; including choosing a script, casting , blocking, production elements, and analyzing the play for conflict, climax and resolution. Students learn how to best dramatize the action with all of the scenic elements, and most importantly, learn how to work well with actors. The course culminates in student directed scenes and/or one acts.
Prerequisite: DRA 1003 Acting I or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

DRA 3001: History of Theatre: The Subversive Art
An introduction & overview of the theatre art form that is both central and counter to Western culture. From the theatre of the ancient Greeks through the Medieval Morality and Mystery plays, Renaissance and Restoration up to the Modern theatre of the early 20th century, this course examines classic works from each period and evaluates the social, cultural, and philosophical opinions of their times, reflecting on how they impact society today.
Prerequisite: ELA 1500 Voices of Community or permission of instructor.
3 credits

DRA 3017: Playwriting Workshop
Students will learn the essential skills of writing an original play by demonstrating the ability to decide on an “occasion” for the script, how to establish the use of location and setting, character development, plot (including conflict, climax and resolution), exposition, structure, dialogue, set and costume requirements. The course will culminate in completed works by each student that will be presented in an evening of readings. Prerequisite: ELA 1031 Theater: The Audience Environment or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

DRA 2053/ 3053/4053: Special Topics in Theatre The various levels of this course allows advanced study of the art by providing a forum for students to examine a particular social issue as it has been dealt with in different plays or by focusing on a particular playwright or group of playwrights. Students will demonstrate an understanding and ability to analyze particular social issues through the plays’ messages. Subtitles of this course may include: “Portrayals of Women in Theatre and Film,” “Politics & Social Satire in Theatre,” “Race in the American Theatre”. The playwrights covered may include: “Modern British Writers”, “America’s Southern Voices”, “ Pulitzer Prize Playwrights”,. Note: DRA 3053 may be taken up to 6 credits when a different subtitle is used.
Prerequisite: ELA 1500 Voices of Community or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

DRA 4042: Modern and Contemporary Drama: Challenging Status Quo
This course examines modern theatre in the context of its challenge to how we understand our history, lives and cultural environment. Students will demonstrate proficiency in tracing contemporary drama back to its roots in the plays of Europe’s 19th century social activist playwrights Ibsen, Chekov and Shaw, as well as examining the impact of the Moscow Art Theatre and Stanislavski’s Acting Method on America’s first major modern playwright Eugene O’Neill and his contemporary theatrical heirs. Student success will be assessed through discussions, research papers, and scene presentations. Prerequisite: ELA 1031 Theatre: The Audience Environment or permission of instructor.
3 credits

DRA 1037/2037/3057: Performance/Production Seminars
Specialized “hands-on” courses taught by visiting professionals in areas such as Voice and Movement, Acting for the Camera, Make-up and Costume, Musical Theatre, Set and Lighting Design, Street Theatre Improvisation, Technical Theatre.
Prerequisite: DRA 1003 Acting 1 and /or Departmental Approval
Note: may be taken more than once when a different subtitle is used.
3 credits



ECO (top)

ECO 2001: Introduction to Microeconomics
This course is an introduction to economics in general and to the study of microeconomics in particular. Economic theory and applications will be developed from a standpoint of the individual in the economy: the individual as a consumer of goods and a supplier of resources, the firm as a producer of goods and a purchaser of resources, and the operation of individual markets and industries. This course will demonstrate how the economic decisions of these individual units affect the well-being of society as a whole.
3 credits

ECO 2002: Introduction to Macroeconomics
This course emphasizes the problems of national income accounting, growth measurement, and fiscal and monetary policy. Economic theory will be developed from the viewpoint of society as a whole. The fiscal and monetary policy tools available to the government will be discussed. Keynesian and Monetarist economic theories will be used to demonstrate the effect that these government policies have on national income, employment, and price level changes.
3 credits

ECO 2023: Economics of the Environment
This course provides students with a firm foundation in economic theory with particular emphasis on the neoclassical model of market efficiency. With this foundation, students study the subfield of environmental and natural resource economics. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding market failures associated with public goods and externalities along with the policies that the government can use to correct these market failures. The course explores critiques of the neoclassical model of market efficiency and considers emerging concepts in ecological economic and the growing local economies movement. Students assess competing views on the potential for continued economic growth of the macro economy and become familiar with our monetary system and the role of the Federal Reserve. Quantitative skills are developed throughout the course by interpreting data and doing economic analyses.
3 credits

ECO 3001: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
This course studies the allocation of resources and determination of prices within various market structures. These will be studied in the contexts of the consumer, the employer and the worker. The determination of income will also be studied. There will be emphasis on analytic tools.
Prerequisite: ECO 2001 Introduction to Microeconomics
3 credits

ECO 3002: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
This course studies the forces that determine the level of aggregate economic activity.
Prerequisite: ECO 2002 Introduction to Macroeconomics.
3 credits

ECO/ELA 3023: Contemporary Political Economy
This course will examine the origins and character of the tendency towards crisis in capitalist market systems with emphasis on the contemporary American economy. At the core of our study will be the effort to understand how the forces in a market society affect community, family, the workplace, the environment and the general world order. In particular we will study income and wealth inequality across generations, the role that disasters (natural, financial and political) have played in providing opportunity for profit and the economic doctrines that have supported and explained these market processes and outcomes.
3 credits

ECO 3033: International Trade
A brief history of trade and commerce and their relationship to the internal patterns of society, followed by a more detailed analysis of the historical and theoretical origins and present-day patterns of modern trade and finance. A major focus will be the recent trends toward consolidation of the world’s nations into trading blocs such as the European Union and NAFTA and the role of international lending policies (IMF. the World Bank) and global agencies (World Trade Organization and GATT) in facilitating trade and finance.
Prerequisite: ECO 2001 Introduction to Microeconomics and ECO 2002 Introduction to Macroeconomics.
3 credits



EDU (top)

EDU 1000: Introduction to Environmental Education
This course is an introduction to the field of environmental education (EE). Students will examine what EE is, how it has evolved, and future trends in the field. Research, theories, resources, and careers will be introduced. Students will have opportunities to observe and interact with EE professionals.
3 credits

EDU 1062: Teacher as Decision Maker
This introductory course examines some of the multitude of decisions teachers consciously make, and consciously or unconsciously don’t make, affecting students’ lives. These decisions will be explored within the larger social context in which they occur. Also, a variety of techniques and strategies used by PreK-12 teachers will be introduced and critically examined. Required of all education majors.
3 credits

EDU 1200: Praxis
This course is a lab designed to refresh students’ abilities in math, reading, and writing in preparation for the Praxis I test required of teacher candidates by the state of Vermont. Instruction proceeds by addressing each skill area in turn and will be modified to meet student needs. The course culminates in all students taking Praxis I. Students need to pass the Praxis I test in order to student teach and to complete any of the programs leading to a recommendation for licensure.
0 credit

EDU 2000: Early Field Experience
This course offers 40 hours of involvement in an elementary, secondary, or special education setting appropriate to the student's career goal in education. This field-based course requires students to volunteer forty hours in a classroom or other educational setting. Working with a cooperating host teacher, students observe and participate in daily classroom activities and duties. Students may assist in preparing lesson plans or materials, and work with students one-on-one, in small groups, or in whole class activities. Involvement will vary depending on individual experience and will be arranged during meetings with the cooperating teacher. The course meets as a group only once at the start of the semester to discuss the syllabus and expectations for student work in schools. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker or permission of instructor.
1 credit

EDU 2018 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence to Adulthood
This course traces the development of the human being from the onset of adolescence to its completion in the late teen years. Theories regarding the development of prosocial and antisocial behaviors, gender identity, depression and suicide, effects of puberty, bullying, educational and vocational choices and media influences are discussed. Work of such theorists as Erikson, Baumrind, Klaczynski and others are considered.
3 credits

EDU 2019: The Exceptional Child
This course discusses the major categories of exceptionality which the practicing special education teacher will encounter. These include cognitive disabilities, autism, learning disabilities, behavioral/emotional disorders and physical disabilities. Consideration will be given to legal bases for the education of these children, including Federal court decisions and legislation. Students will be grounded in understanding procedures for educating exceptional children, such as the creation of the IEP, safeguarding of rights, and so on.
3 credits

EDU 2021: Language and Literacy I
This course introduces a research to practice model for teaching literacy to elementary age children. A specific focus is placed on current scientifically-based methods of teaching literacy as identified by the National Reading Panel and subsequent national and international research efforts. A heavy emphasis is put on the importance of varying domains of phonology (phonemic awareness especially), and other crucial language systems and patterns upon which proficient reading and spelling depends. A plethora of dynamic strategies for teaching spelling, writing, reading fluency, and reading comprehension are introduced in this course. Understanding of foundational skills of the English language will support reading instruction. Students work heavily with the Vermont Framework Standards as well as the Common CORE standards. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 3032-Language and Literacy II.
3 credits

EDU 2031: Secondary Education Methods I
This course focuses on specific techniques to enhance or develop reading and writing skills with multiple forms of text, and on assessment practices which allow the teacher to identify strengths and weaknesses in the material, in student skills, and in the teacher’s own practice. In addition, this course reviews learning theory and general pedagogical techniques and provides an opportunity for practice. This course also requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. This course is required of all Secondary Education candidates and Art Prek-12 candidates. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2000 Early Field Experience, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3001: Special Topics in Education
This is an advanced readings or research seminar on issues, theories, and/or methods of Education. Topics vary and the course may be repeated for credit if the topic changes.
3 credits

EDU 3002: Literature Across the Curriculum
Designed to introduce and explore a wide variety of children’s literature ranging from picture books to young adult selections, EDU 3002 is for prospective teachers and others interested in working with children in classroom, service learning, or place-based educational settings. The main goals of this course are to introduce students to examples of outstanding children’s and young adult literature, explore methods that enhance student understanding and enjoyment of books and reading, and to facilitate growth as an advocate, proponent, and teacher of reading and literature. Long time favorites, as well as exciting new titles will be read, reviewed, analyzed, discussed and evaluated. An emphasis on vocabulary and reading comprehension will also be addressed. Another critical component of the course is to facilitate the development of a personal philosophy about the value of children’s/young adult literature across the curriculum, as well as the exploration of new creative classroom methodologies.
3 credits

EDU/CMJ 3012Environmental Interpretation and Communication
This course will explore the theories, principles, and techniques of interpreting cultural, historical, and natural resources. The course will explore relevant educational, social, psychological, and philosophical theories relevant to interpretive learning and communication. Students will synthesize and apply interpretation theories and methods, refine interpretive communication and publishing skills, and undertake independent research while working on service learning project(s).
3 credits

EDU/PHI 3013: Philosophy of Education
This course explores the fundamental question of the place of public education in a liberal democracy. The goal is for students to draw on important philosophical ideas to construct a carefully reasoned position on public education. Authors and arguments from a range of philosophical traditions will be applied to case studies of contemporary educational practices, policies, and proposed reforms. Skills of analysis will be developed through written and oral exercises. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

EDU 3014: Environmental Education: Placed-Based Education
This course will examine place-based education as a means of achieving local ecological and cultural sustainability. By experientially learning about the local past, current, and future human and non-human communities, students will have opportunities to engage in critical inquiry. Additionally, students will learn techniques for exploring and extending local knowledge, and will examine many of the educational, legal, ethical, and technical issues involved in local documentation and publishing projects. Students will apply place-based education theory and methods and complete independent research while participating in place-based education service learning project(s).
3 credits

EDU/HIS 3015: History of Education
Aristotle said that the central task of government is to look after the education of youth. This course examines the ways in which the peoples of the United States have wrestled with that dictum since passing the first education law in 1647. Readings will change from semester to semester depending upon whether the central focus is curriculum–what should be taught to whom, how, and why; or the development and evolution of the public school system. Students will gain a critical understanding of the forces that created the public school in its current form and the tensions which underlie current policy issues. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

EDU 3021: Curriculum and Instruction for Mild to Moderate Disabilities
This course instructs the student how to develop curricula and instructional strategies for students having mild to moderate disabilities, including cognitive disabilities, learning disabilities, attention disorders and behavioral disorders. Students will learn the relevance of legislation such as I.D.E.A., Act 230 and 504 to curriculum, Response to Intervention and IEP development. Experiences are provided in assessment, task analysis and lesson planning for students with special needs. Students learn to create developmentally appropriate IEPs, lesson plans and instructional units that meet Vermont state standards and the Common Core. This course is required for the special education endorsement. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3032: Language and Literacy II
This course is designed to give participants in depth knowledge of phonetics, phonology, orthography, and morphology which are the building blocks for effective teaching of word recognition, vocabulary, and spelling. Various methodologies for teaching vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension will be included in this course, as well as story grammar and approaches to effectively teach writing. Students will learn strategies for assessment and instructional intervention and will work closely with the Vermont Frameworks as well as the Common Core Standards. The course is a continuation of topics undertaken in Language & Literacy I, delving deeper into study of sophisticated linguistic systems. Prerequisites: EDU 2021 Language & Literacy I.
3 credits

EDU 3034: Language Development and Disorders
This course explores components of typical and atypical language development, and will visit behavioral manifestations associated with language disorders and their influence on academic functioning. Written language skills and their relationship to educational instruction will be stressed. The communication disorders of childhood and adolescence are associated with personal, social, academic, and life-long challenges. This course will consider these disorders by presenting various linguistic domains and by differentiating between speech and language disorders, especially manifested during the school years. Among other in-depth assignments, students will complete an intensive language evaluation for a child under the age of five years old noting developmental landmarks as identified throughout the course. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3070: Elementary Social Studies Methods
This course is designed to introduce content and methods for teaching Social Studies to elementary students. Hands-on experiences will help familiarize the prospective teacher with resources, texts, and current educational trends in the area of social studies. Topics include theory, assessment, and an overview of content and standards included in the elementary Social Studies curriculum. The primary focus is the development of a personal philosophy of teaching elementary Social Studies, as well as the creation and practice of new creative classroom methodologies that will enable excellent, effective teaching of elementary Social Studies. The course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities as well as the Common Core Standards.
3 credits

EDU 3071: Elementary Math Methods
This course is designed to introduce content and methods for teaching mathematics to elementary students. Methods of teaching mathematics will be taught through hands-on discovery of measurement, statistics, geometry, patterns and functions, number, and arithmetic concepts, as well as technological applications. Additional topics include theory, assessment, and an overview of content included in the elementary mathematics curriculum. The primary focus is classroom methodologies that value conceptual understanding rather than procedural computation alone so that students will develop a PUMC (profound understanding of mathematical concepts) through a problem solving approach. Students will learn the underpinnings of mathematical concepts which will enable them to better understand common errors that children make as well as will enable excellent, effective teaching of elementary mathematics. The course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities as well as the Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker and a minimum of completion of CLC math.
3 credits

EDU 3072: Elementary Science Methods
Methods of teaching aspects of physical, life, health, and earth science found in the elementary school curriculum will be taught through a discovery based scientific inquiry process. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities. Prerequisites: A physical, earth, or biological science course or permission of instructor. Lab fee may apply.
3 credits

EDU 3100: Observation Practicum
By arrangement, candidates will spend a minimum of 60 hours in a classroom/school setting specific to their area of licensure, in which they will also be doing their student teaching (if appropriate). The primary goal is to observe and collect data and evidence needed to prepare entries needed for the Level I Licensure Portfolio for the State of Vermont (or the equivalent for Degree Track candidates). Candidates are to collect information about the school, its culture, the classroom(s) in which they are immersed, and the students being taught. This course will take place the semester before student teaching (Licensure Track) or by arrangement with the candidate’s Education advisor (Degree Track). Prerequisite: EDU 2000 Early Field Experience.
4 credits

EDU 4012: Teaching Methods in Secondary Science
This course is designed to explore and develop the teacher’s role in the teaching of science in the secondary classroom. This course will teach the student to design lessons and thematic units that meet national and state standards and use technology to promote learning. Additionally, while students who take this course are biology majors, it is recognized that they will be certified to teach materials in the other sciences. These may include physics, chemistry and earth science. A broad emphasis on the principles of science education, therefore, are presented in order to prepare students for this expanded role.
4 credits

EDU 4022: Assessment in Special Education
An in-depth, advanced study of the concepts of validity, reliability and statistical properties of tests initially covered in Education 3021. Practice in the administration, analysis and interpretation of commonly used educational tests and other assessment techniques is combined with developing comprehensive IEPs and learning how they assess proficiency in the Common Core. Projects are assigned and there is a field component to the course. This course is required for the special education endorsement. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU/PSY 4031: Assessment and Management of Behavior
The course includes presentation and intensive discussion of learning approaches based on respondent and operant conditioning paradigms in classroom and clinic venues. Legal and ethical issues pertaining to behavior modification techniques, including IEP development, permissible and prohibited techniques of behavior modification and case management are covered. Consideration is given to such topics as token economies, modeling, desensitization, punishment and approaches to behavioral problems. Required of all education majors. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker.
3 credits

BIO/EDU 4035: Content for Secondary Science Teachers
This course provides a content-rich learning experience for students who wish to become certified as science teachers in the secondary schools of Vermont. This content is complementary to that studied in the wide range of required courses in GMC’s science teaching sequence. A prerequisite for this course is EDU 4012, which emphasizes the development of a broad understanding of diverse methods in the teaching of science. EDU/BIO 4035 provides content focusing on physics and earth/space science. Its content is based on the Vermont State Board of Education Manual of Rules and Practices and the National Science Education Standards (NSES) for secondary science teachers.
4 credits

EDU 4053: Environmental Education: Practicum
This course is an opportunity for students to participate in environmental education fieldwork. Students will be required to complete a 120-hour work experience under the direction of a qualified environmental education professional. Written work related to this experience will be required. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

EDU 4081: Secondary Education Methods, History and English
This course reviews and reinforces competencies gained from prior education courses while focusing on synthesizing all relevant skills and knowledge into a coherent and workable practice. The goal is to develop a conscience of craft and to prepare people to student teach in the following semester. This is a demanding, hands-on course conducted seminar style. While the approach is cross-disciplinary, there are discipline-specific components. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2031 Secondary Methods I or permission of instructor.
4 credits

EDU 4082: Art Methods
This course reviews and reinforces competencies gained from prior education courses while focusing on synthesizing all relevant skills and knowledge into a coherent and workable practice. The goal is to develop a conscience of craft and to prepare people to student teach in the following semester. This is a demanding, hands-on course conducted seminar style. While the approach is cross-disciplinary, there are discipline-specific components. Art Methods covers PreK-12 teaching contexts. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2000 Early Field Experience, EDU 2031 Secondary Methods I, or permission of the instructor.
4 credits

EDU 4085: Student Teaching
This is a semester of full-time student teaching and an accompanying seminar done in the senior year by all candidates seeking teacher licensure. A student teaching experience totaling 15 weeks is arranged within the immediate geographical area of the College (if appropriate). Student teachers are supervised by a member of the Education Department at least once every 10 days. Transportation to the site is the responsibility of the student. Art candidates student teach for 7/8 weeks in grades preK-6 and 7/8 weeks in grades 7-12. Special Education students teach for 7/8 weeks in a special education placement and 7/8 weeks in an elementary classroom. All other candidates student teach in one setting. Candidates have all the duties and must conform to all the expectations of a regular classroom teacher. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required education courses; senior standing; meeting GPA requirements; passing Praxis I and II; and permission of the Education Department. Application for student teaching must be made to the Education Department by the middle of the semester prior to the year of student teaching. In order to license, candidates must receive a grade of B or higher in both EDU 4085 and EDU 4086.
9 credits

EDU 4086: Student Teaching Seminar
This is the 3-credit portion of the student teaching experience in which student teachers participate in a weekly seminar which guides them through the process of compiling and completing their Level I Licensure Portfolio for the state of Vermont, a requirement for licensure. Students will also focus on and complete assignments in the areas of classroom management, lesson planning, and other related areas. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required education courses; senior standing; meeting GPA requirements; passing Praxis I and Praxis II; and permission of the Education Department. Application for student teaching must be made by the middle of the semester prior to the year of student teaching. In order to license, candidates must receive a grade of B or higher in both EDU 4085 and EDU 4086.
3 credits.



ENG (top)

ENG 1003: English as a Foreign Language I
To meet the particular needs of students whose native language is not English, this course offers instruction and practice in conversational skills, basic structure and vocabulary, and reading/writing. The work is adapted to the requirements of those enrolled. Open only to non-native speakers. Student will place “in” and “out” of this course with permission of the instructor.
4 class hours
4 credits

ENG 1010: Introduction to Literary Studies
This course prepares students to conduct research on literary subjects, analyze works of literature, employ MLA documentation, locate and evaluate research sources, and apply essential critical theories. This course will include reading classic literary texts and pertinent criticism, as well as research writing. This course is required as the introductory course for English and Writing majors.
3 class hours
3 credits

ENG 2011: British Literature to 1800
This course provides a survey of British Literature, from early texts translated from Old and Middle English to the beginning of the Romantic period. Students will gain a familiarity with the major developments and historical contexts of early British Literature, as well as with key figures such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton.
3 credits

ENG 2012: British Literature from 1800 to the Present
Building on students’ familiarity with the traditions of British Literature covered in ENG 2021, this course surveys important trends in British Literature from the Romantic period through the present age. Students will learn about some of the major issues and historical contexts shaping the literature written by figures such as Wordsworth, Dickens, Austen, Woolf, and Larkin.
3 credits

ENG 2015: Introduction to Creative Writing
This course, which is a prerequisite to upper-division writing workshops, will introduce students to the basic structures and strategies used by creative writers working in genres such as fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama. In addition to becoming familiar with techniques for idea generation, development, and revision, students will share their own writing in workshop settings, learning to critique the work of their peers in respectful and constructive ways.
3 credits

ENG 2020: History of the English Language
This course will provide an overview of how the English language has evolved from its Germanic roots, through the infusion of Norman French and beyond, leading eventually to the emergence of contemporary dialects. Students will learn about the historical and intellectual contexts of this evolution, and come to see that rules of grammar and syntax are properly understood as descriptive, rather than prescriptive.
3 credits

ENG 2021:American Literature to 1860
This course will survey major trends and developments in American literature from exploration narratives through the flowering of literary experimentation in the years preceding the Civil War. In addition to studying such characteristically American forms as captivity narratives and personal accounts of slavery, students will become familiar with the work of major figures such as Bradstreet, Irving, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Dickinson.
3 credits

ENG 2022: American Literature from 1860 to the Present
Building on the knowledge acquired in ENG 2021, students in this course will survey major trends in American literature from the outbreak of the Civil War to the present, developing an understanding of Romantic, Realist, Modernist, and Postmodernist movements. Students will also gain a familiarity with the major American authors of this period, such as Twain, H.D., Hughes, Faulkner, and Morrison.
3 credits

ENG 3007: World Literature
This course is intended to expand the breadth of current English offerings by offering students the chance to study literature from cultures that exist beyond the major British and American traditions. Some sections of this course may choose a cross-cultural approach, looking at images of nature, for example, in Asian, African, and Eastern European cultures. Other sections may focus specifically on one cultural tradition, such as Japanese poetry or the modern Arabic novel, or on postcolonial studies of the literature of former British colonies. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 1010 Introduction to Literary Studies or permission of instructor.
3 credits

ENG 3011: Environmental Writing Workshop
This workshop asks students to focus their original creative writing on the ways in which humans relate to their environments. The course may be taken multiple times as different sub-titles are specified. A rotating focus for the Environmental Writing Workshop includes subtopics such as Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Filed Journaling, Fiction, and Natural History Writing. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 2015 Introduction to Creative Writing, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

ENG/DRA 3017: Writing Workshop
This intensive writing course focuses on a specific genre or category of writing, such as poetry, playwriting, short fiction, screenwriting, etc. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 2015 Introduction to Creative Writing or permission of the instructor.
3 class hours
3 credits

ENG 3019: Teaching Writing & Grammar
The course combines study of research on teaching writing, examination of dominant schools and authorities on writing instruction, and study of grammar with constant application and reflection on that practice. Theory and practice will be joined in a dialectic. The course is offered spring semester to coincide with Voices of Community. In addition to two hours of class each week, students will be assigned to a section of Voices where they will provide writing assistance for the students in that section. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and demonstrated competence as a writer. Written competence demonstrated by submission of a writing sample at the first class meeting, to be evaluated by the instructor.
3 credits

ENG 4000: Senior Thesis
Working closely with a faculty mentor through the semester, the student prepares an extended critical research paper on a topic in English studies. The student must arrange for a mentor before registration. A minimum of seven individualized conferences with the mentor is required. If the thesis is taken as a summer course, the student will be billed separately for tuition. Prerequisite: Junior standing or department permission.
4 credits

ENG 4001: Internship
Supervised by a faculty mentor, the student completes a period of practical experience in a paid or unpaid workplace position which draws on English skills. Prior approval of advisor must be obtained before registering and start of internship. Student’s evaluative report, daily journal, and workplace supervisor’s letter are required. If taken as a summer course, the internship requires a separate tuition fee. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of department.
4 credits

ENG 4009: Senior Writing Project
All Writing majors must complete the Senior Writing Project, producing a substantial, unified body of original work, such as a novella, a play, a collection of stories, a collection of poems, a work of creative nonfiction, or a collection of essays. Working with a faculty mentor, students will take their work through a series of steps, including review, drafting, and revising. This project will culminate in a public reading arranged by the student.
4 credits

ENG 4010: Writing Practicum
While not a required course in the Writing major, the practicum offers the student an opportunity to receive credit for workplace experience using writing skills. The position may be volunteer work, or paid or unpaid employment. Students keep a journal and a portfolio of work and arrange for a supervisor’s letter. The practicum is monitored and evaluated by a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Junior standing or department permission.
3 credits

ENG 4015: Literature of Diversity
This course studies literature translated from other languages, Anglophone literature from outside the United Kingdom and the United States, and literatures from minority or special populations in North America. Offerings have included World Epics, Comparative Mythology, Women and Literature, African-American Literature, and Native American Women Writers. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 1010 Introduction to Literary Studies or permission of instructor.
3 credits

ENG 4016: Seminar in Literary Genres
This course will provide students with an opportunity for more intensive study of a single literary genre than is possible in a survey course. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Beginnings of the Novel, Contemporary Drama, Romantic Poetry, Literary Nonfiction, the Contemporary Long Poem, Gothic Fiction, the Sonnet, and Postmodern Narrative. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 1010 Introduction to Literary Studies and one survey course.
3 credits

ENG 4017: Seminar in Literary Figures & Movements
This course will provide students with an opportunity for more intensive study of a single literary figure or movement than is possible in a survey course. Topics may include, but are not limited to, William Shakespeare, the Beats, Emily Dickinson, William Faulkner, the Bronte sisters, the Fireside Poets, Robert Frost, the Transcendentalists, and Modernism. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 1010 Introduction to Literary Studies and one survey course.
3 credits

ENG 4018: Seminar in Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature
This course will provide students with an opportunity for a sustained and truly interdisciplinary study of literature. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Studies in the Sense of Place, Ecology and Literature, Buddhism and Literature, Film and Literature, Psychology and Literary Naturalism, and Bioregional Literature. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 1010 Introduction to Literary Studies and one survey course.
3 credits



ENV (top)

ENV 1001: Introduction to Environmental Studies
Environmental Studies is a critical, interdisciplinary, problem-solving major that seeks to cultivate students capable of analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing information from multiple sources so that they can render reasoned decisions and take appropriate, effective action. This course is designed to introduce you to the interdisciplinary field of Environmental Studies. To that end, I will endeavor to acquaint you with a variety of environmental issues, and the way various disciplines address that issue. This course will introduce the areas you will study further in the Environmental Studies majors through a case study method. This course will also help you develop an understanding of contemporary bioregional theory and apply this understanding to your new bioregion.
1 credit

ENV 1011: Fundamentals of Organic Agriculture
An introduction to the history, ethics, and fundamental principles of the organic agriculture movement and its relationship to sustainable food, fiber, and seed production. This course will examine the biological, economic and ethical dimensions of designing a small farm or market-based garden system. Concepts covered will include garden design and rotation, seed selection, plant morphology, soil structure and composition, seedling production, transplanting, season extension, diseases and pests, harvest methods, and marketing.
3 credits

ENV 1075: Farming Skills Intensive
Many components of an integrated farm system draw on a specialized skill set and body of knowledge and are best learned in an intensive setting that combines theory and practice. This course will immerse students in a particular aspect of sustainable farming. Students will work with agricultural faculty and agricultural practitioners, generally in the field or at the practitioner’s operation, to explore and apply the theory and knowledge regarding the topic at hand in a workshop format. Potential topics include greenhouse management, plant propagation, winter farming, draft animal driving and training, and draft animal utilization. (Note: Topics with sufficient depth and demand will be presented in a two course series, e.g. season extension design and season extension crop management.)
1 credit

ENV 1085: REED Skills Intensive
Preparing students for the world of sustainable design and renewable energy requires both knowledge and practical experience. The REED Skills Intensives are 2-3 day courses that immerse students in a specific, hands-on aspect of sustainable design and/or renewable energy systems. Students will work with GMC faculty, local design professionals and accomplished craftspeople to gain valuable skills that prepare students for careers in the design and energy fields Generally, topics with sufficient depth and demand will be presented in a two-course series. Potential topics include photovoltaic/solar thermal design and installation, sustainable furniture design/build, wood turning, computer aided drafting/modeling, and home energy audits and weatherization.
1 credit

ENV 1100: REED External Practicum
The external practicum allows students to enroll in skills-based courses offered by external institutions related to renewable energy and ecological design. Possible schools include Solar Energy International, Yestermorrow Design/Build School, Ecosa, and others pending faculty approval.
1-3 credits

ENV 1211: Introduction to Cerridwen Farm
Students in this course will be responsible for one morning chore shift a week at Cerridwen farm (~2 hrs/week). This will include helping with vegetable management in season (cultivating, harvesting, processing) as well as animal management and care—feeding, cleaning, and moving animals, gathering eggs, milking the cow, etc. In addition, all farm hands will meet for one hour a week with the farm manager to discuss and learn about various aspects of managing Cerridwen Farm.
1 credit

ENV 2001: Campus Sustainability
This course aims to inform students about institutional sustainability initiatives (incl. environmental, social and economic), and to encourage students to serve as advocates for sustainability at GMC. Students will learn about the history of the campus sustainability movement, and its impact at GMC. They will learn about tools being used to assess and implement sustainable behavior on college campuses, and critically analyze popular metrics. Finally, students will focus on effective communication and outreach skills to broadcast messages of sustainable behaviors to multiple stakeholders within campus community.
1 credit

ENV 2002: Food Preservation
Throughout most of human history, domestic-scale food preservation has been of vital significance. Today, as an alternative to industrially processed products, small-scale food preservation can play an integral role in sustaining locally based food systems. This course gives students the opportunity to investigate the history, theory, and practice of such traditional means of food preservation as lactic fermentation, pickling, drying, salting, and root cellar storage of seasonal products, such as fish, herbs, fruits, and vegetables. Students will learn the fundamentals of preservation processes through hands-on in-class and field-based activities and experiences, and, in particular, work in collaboration with Green Mountain College’s Cerridwen Farm in doing group projects demonstrating principles of food preservation with portions of the fall season’s harvest. The course will survey the history and diversity of food preservation practices and technologies that have evolved in response to the problems of place (tropical vs. temperate), and scale (home use vs. market commodity). It will explore different processes, ranging from ancient techniques to more modern methods, for preserving a diversity of local products and investigate how they were preserved in different types of traditional food systems (hunting-gathering, pastoral, and farming).
3 credits

ENV 2010: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Geographic information systems is a computer-based system that stores, retrieves, visualizes, queries, and analyzes digital data. This data can represent topography, soils, population, infectious disease outbreaks, areas of pollution, town zoning, rivers, town boundaries, protected environments, etc. GIS is used to address numerous areas of inquiry, including: (1) natural and social sciences, (2) community planning, (3) resource management, (4) habitat assessment & ecological monitoring, (5) environmental modeling, and many others! This class will introduce you to the fundamental theories and concepts of a GIS, cartographic design, database management, spatial analysis, and provide hands on experience through a service-learning project.
4 credits

ENV 2011: Public Policy & the Environment
An introduction to the environmental policy process in the United States. Focuses on the history and evolution of political institutions, federal and state roles in decision-making, and the global context of U.S. environmental policy. Emphasizes the intersection of science and policy. Specific topics include federalism, mechanics and elements of policy formation, the political uses of science, risk assessment and management, scientific uncertainty, environmental justice, and implementation and enforcement of environmental policies.
3 credits

ENV 2015: Environmental Advocacy, Public Policy & Corporate Responsibility
This course investigates the important role that citizen action plays in bringing about positive environmental and social change. Throughout history, citizen action has brought about significant changes in public policies and corporate behavior for environmental and social improvement. This course investigates the role that individuals and advocacy groups play in the development of environmental policy and demanding corporate environmental responsibility. The full range of options for citizen participation in the democratic and market processes are reviewed.
3 credits

ENV 2019: Special Topics on Energy & the Environment
This course offers students an opportunity to conduct an in-depth investigation of a current topic on energy and the environment. Each time the course is offered, it will focus on a different topic. Topics may include transportation, electric utility deregulation, renewable energy, or energy use and global climate change. A topic for the course will be selected from current issues facing society and based on students’ interests. This is a policy-oriented course that is designed to provide students a hands-on, research-oriented learning experience.
3 credits

ENV 2060: Biodiversity Issues in Agriculture: Seeds & Trees
This course will take a comparative approach to understanding the role of biodiversity in agriculture using cultural, biological, and geographic perspectives. It will cover the emergence and diffusion of crop diversity in different traditional agricultural systems, and trace the erosion of this heritage with the rise of scientific breeding and industrial agriculture. We will also investigate a range of contemporary agrobiodiversity issues: ex situ vs. in situ conservation, participatory breeding, global policy, the threat of GM (genetically modified) crops, and the relationship between biological and cultural diversity.
3 credits

ENV 2061: Biodiversity Issues in Agriculture--Livestock
A diverse array of livestock breeds are disappearing across the globe at alarming rates. The landscapes, management practices, and cultural traditions associated with these livestock are also threatened. The remaining predominate breeds suffer from perilous genetic erosion. This course will examine the conservation strategies and issues surrounding rare breeds of livestock in the U.S. and abroad.
3 credits

ENV 2067: Animal Husbandry
Appropriate animal husbandry is a critical economic, ecological, and ethical element of farming. This course will provide an overview of basic physiological processes and needs of common livestock species, with an emphasis on management techniques that can help maximize livestock health and minimize veterinary investments and interventions.
3 credits

ENV 2070: Sustainable Regional Food Systems
In this interdisciplinary course students will be challenged to conceptualize and present evidence found in our region of a sustainable regional food system, while also researching and describing alternative modes of production, distribution, and consumption that can enhance the viability of the current system. Students’ direct participation in GMC’s Cerridwen Farm will enable them to experience the challenges and realities of consuming foods they produce, process, and prepare from field to fork. This course will also investigate other field sites of our regional food system, exploring the social context and cultural values (including nutrition models) motivating consumption of locally produced and processed food products. Our evaluation and analysis of these factors will be informed by critical readings of current literature addressing sustainable food systems issues from the theoretical and practical perspectives.
3 credits

ENV 2073: Appropriate Technologies in Agriculture
Students will be expected to work 5 hours on the farm plus taking a share in daily chores (max. 2 hours a week). In addition, they will spend 6 to 9 hours a week in curricular activities as outlined below. The course will feature experiential learning and independent study and research in addition to an average of 4 contact hours each week, equivalent to a standard 15-week term’s contact hours.
3 credits

ENV 3000: Special Topics in Environmental Studies
This course is an advanced reading and/or research seminar on issues, theories and/or methods in environmental studies. The course may be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.
3 credits

ENV 3011: Environmental Law
This course is a survey of the leading federal and state statutes and cases on environmental issues. Questions examined during the course of the semester include: Who can bring suit on environmental issues? What results from those lawsuits? How effective are federal and state statutes and regulations in solving environmental problems? How are the implementation and enforcement of environmental statutes affected by the interactions between the branches of government? Prerequisite: ENV 2011 Public Policy & the Environment.
3 credits

ENV 3014: Watershed Management & Policy
Clean water is essential for life, yet this vital resource is not distributed evenly across the planet. Using local, national, and international examples, students will learn about policies—and the politics—that govern water management. This class examines how government institutions have established rules for using water and the decision-making procedures for amending those rules. Students will develop analytical skills by critically assessing the effectiveness of these rules and decision-making processes. We will also explore how private groups have attempted to influence policies related to water pollution, quality and supply. In addition to field excursions within our local watershed and explorations of U.S. water policy, students will develop deeper understandings of the international aspects of water policy, including water conflict and water supply issues in developing countries.
3 credits

ENV 3016: Land Use Planning
This class introduces students to the legal, political, and economic considerations of land use planning. Starting with an overview of land use planning in the United States, students consider different eras of planning and land use law in the United States, specific land use tools (the Town Plan, zoning bylaws, conditional uses, variances, etc.), as well as the current application of land use law. Students also work through Vermont’s Act 250 as both example of statewide land use planning regimes, and as a template for a variety of land use issues including wastewater treatment, impact fees, and traffic considerations. Drawing on the work of Christopher Alexander and others, students contemplate the larger questions of human use and manipulation of space and examine western preference for spatial arrangements.
3 credits

ENV/ELA 3021: Sustainable Development: Theory & Policy
To alleviate poverty and raise living standards, third world nations need to aggressively pursue economic development. If the resource- and energy-intensive western model of development is followed in these countries severe resource shortages and widespread environmental degradation are likely to ensue. Sustainable development theory has emerged to describe an alternative path to economic development that averts potential resource and environmental crises. This course analyzes these theories and critically evaluates alternative sustainable development policies.
3 credits

ENV 3023/SOC 3001: Human Ecology
This course draws strongly on anthropology and ecology, as well as a variety of other disciplines, in order to study humans and human societies from ecological perspectives. We will examine both the benefits and difficulties associated with the application of ecological concepts to humans. Topics include human adaptation; continuity and change in human ecosystems; human epidemiology and infectious disease; and the role of symbolic cognition, politics and power, and globalization as they affect human ecosystems.
3 credits

ENV 3026/PHI 3025: Animal Ethics
What is the appropriate ethical relationship between humans and nonhuman animals? This course is a systematic study of animal ethics, a field that has emerged as a response to the profound impact of human practices on other species. Topics will include animal experimentation, hunting, bushmeat, livestock agriculture, landscape sustainability, biodiversity, companion animals, vegetarianism, activism, suffering, animal intelligence, animal cultures, animal emotions, animal rights law, and the tension between animal rights and environmental ethics.
3 credits

ENV 3028: Wildlife Law & Policy
This is a course about the birds and the bees. –No not that kind of course, but one where we look at how we as a society protect wildlife through laws and policies. In the first part of the course we will examine the wildlife law and policy in the United States. We will look at the various actors and their roles in the system. In the second part of the course we will turn out focus beyond the domestic borders and look at how international law addresses wildlife protection. Students will get to select specific topics for case studies in the final portion of our course.
3 credits

ENV 3031: Environmental Studies Teaching Practicum
Teaching experience for advanced students arranged with an individual faculty member. The course aims to enhance a student’s ability to communicate information and skills learned in the major. Prerequisite: Junior standing and a 3.3GPA.
1-3 credits

ENV 3035: Comparative Environmental Politics
This upper-division seminar for ES majors and other students interested in politics and the environment, is a political science course rooted in the sub-discipline of comparative politics. Each time the course is offered, it focuses on a different salient topic (for example: water wars, Native American environmental politics, or agricultural policy and politics). As a repeatable special topics course, it offers Green Mountain College students, over the course of their educational experience, the opportunity to take a close look at relationships between environmental problems, politics, and policy in diverse places across the globe.
3 credits

ENV 3037: International Environmental Law & Policy
This course is designed to give students an overview of the legal and political framework that constitutes international environmental law. In the first part of the course we will examine the characteristics of international law and distinguish it from domestic law. We will then look at the various actors and their roles in the system. Students will become familiar with the key principles of international environmental law such as the precautionary principle, sovereignty, and sustainable development. In the later part of the course we will examine major international environmental law topics such as: climate change, the oceans, and the relationship between trade and the environment. Students will select four of these major areas for our study.
3 credits

ENV 3052: Advanced Organic Agriculture
The economically-successful and ecologically-sustainable management of agroecosystems requires knowledge from multiple disciplines including botany, soil ecology, plant ecology, entomology, marketing, and small business management. Students will delve into all of these fields as they survey the theory and practice of cutting-edge organic vegetable production and marketing techniques including soil management, plant propagation, pest management, season extension, and direct marketing. Particular emphasis will be placed on planning, observation, and record-keeping with a constant eye on economic efficiency. Prerequisites: ENV 1011 Fundamentals of Organic Agriculture, or permission of instructor.
3 credits

ENV 3054: Sustainable Farming Systems
“Sustainable agriculture” tends to progress from scientific/ecological theories to a set of guiding principles to on-farm applications to evaluations of economic viability. These sets of guiding principles generally evolve into systematic approaches to agriculture and how some farmers in our region have utilized these systems in farm design and practice. Systems studied will include holistic farm management, grass-based farming, Amish systems, agroforestry, and permaculture. Students will spend extensive time on an assigned farm and will design an agriculturally-based campus land use model.
3 credits

ENV 3057: Advanced Topics in Sustainable Agriculture
This course will teach the application of systems theory and systems thinking to the challenge of understanding and designing farm systems. Students will learn how to develop conceptual and analytical models of various components of a farm system including crops and other plants, insects, soil nutrients, energy, marketing strategies, and various farm technologies. Such models will be integrated in the development of a systems model for Cerridwen farm.
3 credits

ENV/HIS 3058: A History of Agriculture: Civilizations, Technology & the Environment
Understanding how previous agricultural methods and technologies have impacted humans and the environment is critical to determining the best methods and technologies for contemporary agriculture—approaches that can best feed human populations while ameliorating the environment. Beginning with an overview of the evolution of agriculture, the course will then focus on the historical development of agriculture in the U.S., with an emphasis on soils, technologies, and on-farm practices.
3 credits

ENV 3070: Integrated Farming Systems
Students will be expected to work 5 hours on the farm plus taking a share in daily chores (max. 2 hours a week). In addition, they will spend 6 to 9 hours a week in curricular activities as outlined below. The course will feature experiential learning and independent study and research in addition to an average of 4 contact hours each week, equivalent to a standard 15-week term’s contact hours.
3 credits

ENV/NRM 3082: Forest Policy & Management
In this course, students will examine the causes and consequences of past policies aimed to promote the long-term economic and ecological health of forest ecosystems. Students will learn about the political institutions and parties involved in the creation and implementation of forest policies at the local, state, national, and international levels. Contemporary issues related to forest management to be covered may include private lands issues, community-based conservation, woody biomass-to-energy initiatives, climate change and carbon sequestration, wilderness policy and management, and urban forestry. Through field trips to local forests, conversations with forestry professionals, and course assignments, students will gain deeper understandings of what sustainable forestry policies might look like in the northeastern United States.
3 credits

ENV 3093: The Environmental Professional
This class provides Environmental Studies majors with the interpersonal skills and knowledge necessary to become professionals in environmental fields. Students study methods of resolving a wide variety of environmental disputes using local case studies and close interaction with local environmental practitioners. Students will assess their strengths and areas of challenge in terms of work, communication and conflict resolution skills, in anticipation of their last year of undergraduate education. Students prepare professional materials, including a portfolio of their academic work, in anticipation of junior year review, internship and professional interviews.
1 credit

ENV 3120: Renewable Energy Technology & Applications
Most of us are aware that society's current energy systems are unsustainable, but few of us can clearly articulate why or what the alternatives may be. This course begins with an assessment of the energy problem and then provides an overview of various renewable energy technologies and their applications. Students will learn about the latest developments in solar energy technology, wind power, geothermal, ocean energy and hydro electric power production. This course emphasizes a quantitative assessment of the resource potential for each form of renewable energy and the challenges associated with large-scale deployment of these systems. Finally, the course highlights the different policy and regulatory approaches to promote greater energy efficiency and increased use of clean, renewable forms of energy. Prerequisite: ELA 1123 Energy & Society.
3 credits

ENV 3125: Ecological Design
Students in Ecological Design will apply their knowledge of ecological design principles and their skills in drawing and design to a real-world design problem. Through research, field study, site analysis, drawing and modeling, students will work through a sustainable building design process from start to finish.
3 credits

ENV 3190: Watershed Alliance Practicum
The Green Mountain College Watershed Alliance internship will entail learning about stream ecology and watershed science, group management skills and techniques in the field and classroom, and science as inquiry. After the successful completion of trainings, students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills working in the field and classroom with local secondary schools. Students must be a junior or senior to apply.
1 credit

ENV 4000: Topics in Energy and the Environment
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore in great detail emerging issues in energy policy and markets. The transition to a sustainable energy future requires innovative approaches to policy and rules governing energy market operations. Topics may include peak oil and the global petroleum market or emerging federal policy to combat global climate change. The topics for this course will be selected based on current events and student interests.
3 credits

ENV 4015: Environmental Policy Research, Writing, and Analysis
The course goal is for groups of students to draft legislation for Vermont’s legislature on environmental issues. To accomplish this we will select and research issues in consultation with state environmental groups. We will explore legal and non-legal research, inside and outside the library, electronic and in print. We will analyze existing legislation on our issue for its effectiveness and political aspects. We will study legislative drafting through studying the principles of drafting, examining existing legislation, and drafting statutes ourselves. Finally, we will lobby our issues with members of the state legislature. We will read deeply in policy analysis and apply what we learn to current environmental issues.
3 credits

ENV 4025: Environmental Design/Build
Design/Build offers students an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to real-world, hands-on projects aimed at benefitting their community. Students will learn about greenbuilding materials and methods, construction tools and techniques, and the design/build process. As a group, students will analyze a site, interview the client, craft a program, collectively work toward an appropriate design solution and work as a team bringing it to life. Prerequisite: ELA 1135 The Nature of Design.
3 credits

ENV 4054: Agroecology
Agroecology is the application of ecological theory to farms as ecosystems. It is also an approach to the sustainable management of farm systems that has arisen out of the perspective of crop and livestock systems as ecosystems. This course will review the theoretical and practical underpinnings of agroecology and teach the fundamentals of an agroecological approach to farming. In particular, it will teach students how to collect and analyze ecological data within the context of a working farm and use this information to develop more sustainable practices.
3 credits

ENV 4090: Internship
Under the direction of an advisor, a student may arrange a period of practical experience that will make substantive use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the Environmental Studies major. Evaluative reports will be expected from both student and off-campus supervisor. Internship proposals will be evaluated by the Environmental Studies Committee, and the internship itself will be monitored and evaluated by the advisor. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.
3 credits

ENV 4093: Research in Environmental Studies
Under the direction of an advisor, a student may arrange to do a research project relating to some area of Environmental Studies. The project should be based on prior course work, and it should result in a formal product. Proposals for a research project will be evaluated by the Environmental Studies committee, but the research will be monitored and evaluated by the advisor. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.
3 credits

ENV 4100: LEED Certification Exam Preparation
This course is designed to prepare students for success when taking the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Associate Exam. The LEED Green Associate credential serves to strengthen your green building qualifications and allows you to market your green building knowledge to potential employers and clients through this widely respected recognition. In order to earn the credential, the US Green Building Council (USGBC) requires students to be engaged in an 'education program that addresses green building principles.' Therefore, GMC students must be either Environmental Studies: Sustainable Design and Energy majors or enrolled in the REED Certificate program. Other students may enroll in the course, but they are not eligible to earn the credential. This course will be offered on a as needed basis and will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
1 credit



GLG (top)

GLG 1000: Geology in Film
Have you ever watched a movie and wondered, “Is that really possible?” Geologists watching these same movies often find themselves thinking, “That’s ridiculous!” This course investigates a varying set of movies, discussing the pertinent geologic processes and evaluates the science behind “Hollywood’s” interpretation and representation of geologic processes and events. Grades will be evaluated based on in-class discussions in addition to outside readings and writing assignments.
1 credit

GLG 1011: Introduction to Geology
This course will focuses on the Earth’s composition, structure, and systems. We will investigate the processes at work within the Earth as well as surface processes that shape the modern landscape. We will examine how geologic phenomena are linked together through dynamic systems and how they impact our environment, society and economy. Laboratory experiences will place a regional emphasis on the geology of Vermont and New England when appropriate. Topics of discussion will include but are not limited to: geologic time, rocks and minerals, earthquakes, volcanoes, the oceans, the atmosphere, weathering, groundwater, glaciers, and plate tectonics.
4 credits

GLG 2031: Soils
This course will examine why soil types vary with time, climate, topography, and geologic materials. Students will learn various soil classification techniques, become familiar with soil taxonomy and basic soil chemistry. An emphasis will be placed on the application of soil science to ecology, geology, and agronomy. Laboratory experiences will consist of a balance between lab-based technical analyses and applied field-based mapping and description techniques.
4 credits

GLG 2041: Geomorphology
This course focuses on the origin and genesis of landforms and landscapes created by processes acting at or near the Earth’s surface. We will primarily focus on the development of continental landscapes (e.g. – volcanoes, glaciers, rivers, oceans, etc) throughout the Cenozoic. Laboratory experiences will investigate spatial relationships between landforms, topographic map interpretation and construction, aerial photograph interpretation, geomorphic mapping, and fluvial processes. Prerequisites: GLG 1011 Introduction to Geology.
4 credits

GLG 2071: Geology Field Experience
This course will travel to a regional, national or international geologic field site. Students will be responsible for trip planning, site logistics, and a field-based research project conducted during the spring or fall semester prior to traveling. The research projects will be directed at describing, analyzing and explaining specific geologic processes, features or events.
3 credits

GLG 3001: Special Topics in Geology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand. The topics covered in the course will vary based on the interests and goals of the students and instructor. Student proposals for course topics can be submitted to the Department of Environmental Studies for consideration. This course will satisfy the requirement for a 3000 level elective.
3 credits

GLG 3010: Climate Dynamics
This course provides a scientific foundation in climate dynamics through multiple scientific perspectives. We will explore the origins of Earth’s climate system, historical and modern climate change, methods used to identify climate change, global atmospheric and ocean currents, ocean and atmospheric chemistry, natural feedback mechanisms, climate forcing, Earth’s energy budget, evaluate global climate models, and explore proposed technological solutions. The primarily goal of this course is to provide a scientific understanding of the physical and chemical processes governing climate.
3 credits

GLG 3041: Hydrogeology
Hydrogeology is the study of the interrelationship between Earth’s systems, with specific interest in the effects of precipitation and evaporation on the occurrence and character of water in streams, lakes, and groundwater. This course will focus on a fundamental understanding of hydrologic processes and reservoirs, the interaction between surface waters and groundwater, hydrologic techniques and instrumentation, and the relationship between human activity and these reservoirs. This course takes a quantitative approach to hydrology, so both homework and laboratory exercises will improve your proficiency with graphical depiction, data interpretation, and applied mathematics.
4 credits

GLG 3051: Sedimentology & Stratigraphy
This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and methods used in the study of the genesis, characteristics, and spatial distribution of sedimentary rocks. We will cover both sedimentary and stratigraphic principles, sedimentary processes and textures, the paleoenvironmental implications of sedimentary rocks, evaluate age relationships, and investigate the modern relationships between humans and sedimentary processes. Laboratory exercises will focus on field-based description and mapping techniques.
4 credits



GOV (top)

GOV 1013: American Government
This course is a study of the functions, structures, and processes of American government within the context of American and Western political traditions. Major questions facing the American polity are discussed with particular attention to Congressional delegation of legislative and judicial responsibility to the federal bureaucracy.
3 credits



HIS (top)

HIS 1021: United States History to 1877
This course concentrates on some of the major social and political events in the history of the American people from colonization through Reconstruction. Political developments emphasized are the growth of constitutionalism and the establishment of political parties. Social themes treated include the idealism and reformism of early 19th century America and the question of slavery as a social institution.
3 credits

HIS 1022: United States History Since 1877
This course concentrates on some of the major social and political events in the history of the American people, covering the period from the end of Reconstruction through World War II. Some themes emphasized are economic growth and the rise of America as a world power. The dominant social theme examined is the transition from the values and attitudes of an agricultural society to those of an urban, industrial society. 3 credits

HIS 2000: Special Topics in History
Offered periodically as faculty are available. The course will provide an opportunity to study themes spanning a broad period of time. Some examples follow: the concept of self-made man in 19th century America, revolution and social change in the less developed countries of Asia in the 20th century, anti-Semitism in 19th century Europe, and Freud and psychohistory in the 20th century. Prerequisite: This course is addressed to Sophomores and Juniors.
3 credits

HIS 2015: Mass Culture in Modern America
Working in the 1920s historians began to notice that a new cultural phenomenon had arisen in America: a mass culture built around such things as radio, movies, consumer products, sports, journalism, and other forms of cultural expression had come to occupy a central place in the lives of millions. This mass culture was displacing the authority of the high culture and giving shape to millions of human lives. This course traces the development of this mass culture in late nineteenth and early 20th century America and charts its progress through the 20th century.
3 credits

HIS 2016: The United States & the Vietnam War
This course is an examination of the American phase of the Indochina war. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the American motives for engagement in Vietnam, the controversy in the United States over the war, and the eventual American withdrawal. Students will also be familiarized with the Vietnamese view of the American effort.
3 credits

HIS/REL 2051: Civilization of India
This course is designed to introduce students to the rich and complex cultures and civilizations of India from ancient times to the present. We will examine the geography, society, politics, economy, and culture of India with particular emphasis on the religious traditions of Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Hinduism, and Islam as they developed in South Asia. The format of the course will emphasize discussion and student presentations.
3 credits

HIS 3000: Special Topics in History
Compelling personalities, themes, developments, or events form the focus of this course. The particular characters, events, etc. will change each time the course is offered. Examples of topics are the following: Napoleon, Hitler and Stalin, riots and popular protest, witchcraft in Europe and America in the 17th century, the origins of World War II, American attitudes toward technology in the 20th century, etc. Prerequisite: This course is addressed to Juniors and Seniors.
3 credits

HIS 3008: Renaissance to Enlightenment Europe
Through a study of the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Reason, this course will focus on the transition to modern society in Western Europe. Through the study of historical documents, particular attention will be paid to the thought and culture of these periods. We will examine the development of the modern world and will explore how the nature of the state and its relationship to the individual was redefined through the conflicting ideologies and developments of this period. Prerequisite: None, but recommend ELA 1057 World History and the Environment.
3 credits

HIS 3009: The Civil War & Reconstruction
This course will concentrate on three episodes in American history: the sectional crisis 1820-1860, the Civil war 1861-18-65, and the Reconstruction 1865-1877. Special emphasis will be placed on the causes of the crisis and war, and students will examine many historical interpretations of the crisis and war. The Reconstruction will be examined both factually and historigraphically.
3 credits

HIS 3012: America in Depression & War, 1921-1945
The Ku Klux Klan, high prosperity, economic depression, and world war provide the backdrop for this view of American society in an era of crises. The historiography of the Great Crash, past and present views of the New Deal and America’s flowering as a world power are the primary foci of this course. Prerequisite: HIS 1022 United States History Since 1877 strongly recommended.
3 credits

HIS 3014: The American West
No other region has had as powerful a hold on the popular imagination as the American West. For more than a century, writers, scholars, artists, and politicians have looked on the West as the locale of the nation’s epic tale, the place where all those things they wished to celebrate about America were forged – democracy, individualism, self-reliance. This course will sort reality from myth by focusing on the diversity of peoples who have inhabited the regions and on them any ways in which they have interacted with each other and the land. Prerequisite: None, but recommend HIS 1021 United States to 1877, HIS 1022 United States Since 1877.
3 credits

HIS/EDU 3015: History of Education
Aristotle said that the central task of government is to look after the education of youth. This course examines the ways in which the peoples of the United States have wrestled with that dictum since passing the first education law in 1647. Readings will change from semester to semester depending upon whether the central focus is curriculum –what should be taught to whom, how, and why; or the development and evolution of the public school system. Students will gain a critical understanding of the forces that created the public school in its current form and the tensions which underlie current policy issues. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

HIS 3023: America Since 1960
This course is an examination of recent US history. It will examine such themes as the Cold War, the Kennedy years, the Great Society, the upheaval of the 1960s, the Reagan Revolution, and the problems of the 1990s. Student will gain a sound historical background to contemporary American Life.
3 credits

HIS 3025: History of Modern China
This course will trace the history of China from the late 19th century to the present. It will focus on the changes brought to Chinese life by the European intrusions and the Chinese revolutions of the 20th century. Special attention will be placed on understanding the emergence of the People’s Republic of China: its evolution from a Maoist state into the pragmatic nation of Deng Xiao Ping.
3 credits

HIS 3028: Revolutionary Europe
This course will examine the long nineteenth century (1789 to 1914) and the impact of the dual revolutions: the 1789 French Revolution and the British Industrial Revolution. We will focus on such topics as: the French Revolution and democratization; Industrialization, class society and gender ideology; political and economic ideologies; science versus romanticism; nationalism and the rise of the nation-state; the New Imperialism and colonial wars; and the build up to the First World War. We will also examine how ideas regarding the individual’s relationship to society and the state were redefined through the conflicting philosophical and political ideologies of the period. Prerequisite: None, but recommend ELA 1057 World History and the Environment.
3 credits

HIS 3029: World Wars to a Unified Europe
This course will explore European history from the start of the First World War to the end of the 20th century. Topics explored will include: the impact of the two World Wars on society, economy and politics in Europe; the Great Depression; European Union; Decolonization; the Cold War; and globalization. We will also examine how ideas regarding the individual’s relationship to society and the state were redefined through the conflicting philosophical and political ideologies of the period. Prerequisite: None, but recommend ELA 1057 World History and the Environment.
3 credits

HIS 3031: Topics in European and World History
This course focuses on a specific theme, society or event in European or World history. May be taken more than once when a different subtitle is offered. Examples of topics include: Celtic Europe, the witch hunt in Europe, British and Irish history, Nations and Nationalism, and Modern India.
3 credits

HIS 3032: Imperialism, Science and the Natural World
This course will focus on imperialism and the imperial agendas of the European powers with respect to the "commons" of the world. We will explore economic and cultural imperialism as it was manifested in the colonial sciences of natural resource management. We will examine a number of interrelated topics—theories of imperialism and its relationship with industrial capitalism; the historical context of mid-to-late 19th c. imperialism; environmental history and conservation; imperial science and applied technologies; expertise, control and racist ideologies; forests and forest management; hunting and game preservation; and shifting cultivation and soil erosion. Our goals will be to comparatively explore the agendas of the colonial states and of agencies therein; examine the environmental justice implications of colonial policies; explore the roots of today’s current globalized economic system; and seek to understand the nature of European hostility to indigenous cultures.
3 credits

HIS 3034: Modern British History
A survey of three centuries of British History beginning with the ascension of George I in 1714 and ending with the Tory government of the 1980's. Principal themes include the development of modern class structure, the rise of laissez faire liberalism and self-interested individualism, urbanization and the decline of rural society in the 19th century, the ascendancy of global capitalism and imperialism, the decline of industry and the creation of a social-democratic "mixed economy" Welfare State in the 20th, World War II and post-war decolonization, and the return to a free market ideology under Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
3 credits

HIS 3036: Modern European Intellectual History
This course is specifically designed for the advanced undergraduate and will provide a critical analysis of the major intellectual trends in European thought. It will be offered on a two year rotation, but when required this course can be bumped (this years I’m teaching it early to help PHI due to a faculty being on sabbatical). Students should be at least familiar with the basic outlines of European history from roughly the 18th century to the present. There is no general textbook, and we will be closely reading a selection of some of the most important texts from this period. Each historical epoch - as defined by past historians - has had its own Weltanschauung (or world view). Although we shall more carefully define this expression during the course of the semester, a world view can be briefly summarized as an intellectual or philosophical matrix which defines humanity’s place in the world (including our social relations). A world view is a mental and historical construct that helps us explain how the world is perceived and how these perceptions change over time. Although there are a number of other trends/themes that will be developed in this course, at base is the concept of a Weltanschauung.
3 credits

HIS 3038: Riots and Popular Protest in European History
This course will examine the "moral economy" of the crowd, continuities and changes in industrializing communities, and more recent social protest movements in European history. Popular protest is one of the most important movers in the history of our species. It has deep roots in a variety of different cultures, and continues to play a key role in the present day. Why do people take to the streets? Why do they form crowds that act with purpose? These are important historical questions and we will also explore the methods and some theories used to try and answer them, and the difficulties of research and sourcing that social history poses. How can we understand people from remote periods who left few, if any, written records? How does one make sense of the actions of crowds of people?
3 credits

HIS/REL 3053: Islamic World
This course examines the emergence and development of the Islamic world from its beginnings in seventh century Arabia until 1800. Special attention will be given to the life of Muhammad as well as the spiritual, ethical, and ritual dimensions of Islam. Highlights of the course include a visit to a mosque as well as reading the Qur’an.
3 credits

ELA/HIS 3054: The Silk Roads
The Silk Roads refer to an extensive network of East-West trade routes that emerged by the first century BCE as commodities, especially silk, from Han China began to reach the Roman Empire. Increased commercial traffic and encounters between various peoples encouraged the spread of ideas, disease, and technology as well. This course will emphasize the trans-ecological, economic, cultural, and biological exchange that linked much of Eurasia and North Africa from the beginning of the Common Era to the late eighteenth century. Major themes in the course include the Central Asian nomads' relationship with the land and with sedentary peoples, the spread of religions along the routes, travel accounts, the emergence of empires, and the maritime trade routes.
3 credits

ELA/HIS 3055: Chicago: History of a Built Environment
This course examines the development of the built environment of Chicago. As the prototypical U.S. industrial city, the development of Chicago illustrates a number of important facets of urbanization. We will examine how the environment was shaped over time, how that then affected the area’s inhabitants, and then how they responded to the successive changes. Human societies are constantly engaged in a dialogue with the environments that they inhabit, no matter how humanized those environments become.
3 credits

HIS/ENV 3058: A History of Agriculture: Civilizations, Technology & the Environment
Understanding how previous agricultural methods and technologies have impacted humans and the environment is critical to determining the best methods and technologies for contemporary agriculture—approaches that can best feed human populations while ameliorating the environment. Beginning with an overview of the evolution of agriculture, the course will then focus on the historical development of agriculture in the U.S., with an emphasis on soils, technologies, and on-farm practices.
3 credits

HIS 3061: Medieval Russia
Medieval Russia frequently remains an obscure chapter in the wider European and Eurasian historical experience. In this course we will examine early Russian (Rus’) political, cultural, social, and economic history from the ninth to the late sixteenth century with special emphasis on the emergence of Kievan Rus’, the influence of Byzantium on the Rus’, the development of the Russian Orthodox Church, the Russian response to Mongol rule, the rise of Muscovy, and the reign of Tsar Ivan the Terrible. Primary sources, film, discussion, and slides of Russian art and architecture are all important features of this course. This course is addressed to Juniors and Seniors.
3 credits

HIS 4001: Seminar
This course is a capstone course for those majoring or minoring in history. It focuses on historiography, research methods, and historical writing. Students will be expected to produce a seminar paper and take that paper through graded stages of proposal, peer review of proposal, oral presentation, and finished work. Students will also be required to address historiographical questions and familiarize themselves with the tools, methods, and products of the professional historian. Prerequisite: Senior history majors or minors only.
3 credits

HIS 4002: Honors Thesis Seminar
This course is a continuation of senior seminar for those majoring in history who have been invited to enter the history departmental honors program. During this course students will prepare and complete a history honors thesis in consultation with their thesis advisor.
3 credits

HIS 4003: Directed Study in History
This course involves individualized study with a member of the department. The projects must involve selected readings and writings or a major research essay. While the course is largely aimed at majors, the course may be taken by non-majors with permission. Prerequisite: Junior level majors or Junior standing and permission.
3 credits

HIS 4053: Internship in History
This course will include supervised work in a history related career activity under the supervision of a professional in that career, regular consultation with a member of the history department who will act as the internship advisor, and production of an internship written project to be presented in fulfillment of the requirements of the course. The supervisor will verify that a minimum of 90 hours was spent in the work experience. The department will make every effort to assist students in locating a placement but is not responsible to provide a placement.
3 credits



HON (top)

HON 1000: Honors Seminar
1 credit

HON 4099: Honors Thesis
Working under the supervision of a faculty chair and two additional faculty committee members, the student prepares thesis on a topic related to his or her major. Students must present and defend this thesis to their committee members before the end of the last class day. Faculty committee members will need to be identified before registering for this course. The topic of investigation will also need to be approved by the student's committee members before registering for this course. Senior standing, current enrollment in the honors program, and permission of Honors Program Director are required.
3 credits



HUM (top)

HUM 2000: Introduction to French Language & Culture
An extensive integrated program of international study which seeks to provide opportunity for acquisition of linguistic skills and cultural immersion. The program is designed to equip students to function in a global context with deeper perception and appreciation for the multi-cultural reality, which is the basis of modern life and society.
3 credits

HUM 2001: Introduction to Spanish Language & Culture
The program will broaden the exposure of students to the world and will bring a new global perspective to the students and the campus, which will enrich both and provide further opportunity for a multi-disciplinary learning context from this new exposure. Furthermore, the program will better equip students to function in a global context with deeper perception and appreciation of a multi-cultural reality, which is the basis of modern life and society. Because it is increasingly important in professional life to have linguistic skills in more than one language, and because the college is not able at this time to provide such a choice of language programs, and because language is best learned contextually, therefore a specific focus of the program is developing the equivalent of two years of study of a foreign language in intensive contextual summer programs with the attendant academic credit in the student's academic degree program.
3 credits



IDS (top)

IDS 4005: Interdisciplinary Studies Senior Project
This course offers the opportunity for a student to do substantial interdisciplinary work in consultation with primary and secondary advisors. This work will culminate in one of the following: (a) a senior thesis, (b) an internship, or (c) a senior project. The thesis, internship, or project must integrate both areas of concentration in the student's Interdisciplinary Studies major, and must be approved by the Program Director and both content area advisors. Prerequisite: Senior standing and a minimum 2.0 GPA.
3 credits



LAW (top)

LAW 1001: Topics in the US Supreme Court
The United States Supreme Court - called the "court of last resort" - is the last word in legal interpretation in the United States. In this class students and instructors will explore a current case pending before the court, read the initial decision by lower courts, and the arguments currently being presented to the U.S. Supreme Court. While the class will focus on the particular arguments in the chosen case, it will also also discuss the implications of various decisions the court might make, and even try to predict what the court will do. Finally, students will have an opportunity to travel to Washington D.C. and watch a live argument at the U.S. Supreme Court.



MAT (top)

MAT 1013/ELA 1008: Precalculus
This course provides the essential mathematical background needed to take calculus. Students should have had three to four years of college preparatory high school mathematics. The emphasis is on developing the concepts that play a central role in calculus by exploring ideas from graphical, numerical, algebraic, and oral perspectives. Prerequisite: Placement at Level 4 or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

MAT 1015/ ELA 1101: Introduction to Statistics
An exploration of the basic concepts of statistics: measures of central tendency, variation, estimating and inference. The focus of this course is on data analysis and making students better consumers of statistics. Exploration of these topics will make use of computer technology. Prerequisite: Placement at Level 4 or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

MAT 1031/ELA 1009: Calculus I: Applications in Real World Issues
Fundamentals of calculus presented in the context of modeling of real world examples. Data from biology, medicine, ecology, education and social sciences is interpreted and modeled with mathematics. Calculus topics taught in relation to the data sets and the context in which the data set arose. This course emphasizes the role of technology in modeling and analyzing data by using calculators. Topics include rates of change, functions and graphs, differentiation, limits, accumulation functions and integration. This calculus highlights the concepts of calculus and the applications as they arise in different fields of research. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT 1013 Precalculus or placement at Level 4 or 5.
3 credits

MAT 1032: Calculus II
Topics include applications of integration, including use of integration in biology, business and statistics. In addition, multivariate calculus, including partial rates of change and multivariate optimization with and without constraints will be studied, as well as differential equations and numerical estimations. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT 1031 Calculus I.
3 credits

MAT 2001: History of Mathematics
In this course the development of mathematics in a historical context will be studied. The evolution of mathematical ideas and the different views of mathematics held by different cultures at different times will be explored.
3 credits

MAT 3000: Topics in Mathematics
A seminar course in advanced mathematical topics such as fractals and chaos, geometry, number theory, or graph theory. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

MAT 3100: Mathematical Modeling I
An introduction to the art of modeling and mathematical modeling. This course links the study of mathematics together with the applications of mathematics to various fields. Topics include: the modeling process, model fitting, discrete dynamical systems, deterministic and stochastic models, optimization, systems of differential equations. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite: MAT 1031 Calculus I with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor.
4 credits

MAT 3200: Mathematical Modeling II
This is a continuation of MAT 3100 Mathematics Modeling I. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT 3100 Mathematics Modeling I.
4 credits

MAT 3500: Seminar in Mathematics
Seminar style course used to investigate one or more areas of mathematics. Students will read through various journal articles gaining an understanding of the underlying mathematical theory along with an appreciation of the utility of mathematics. Topics will be selected to reflect the interests of the students and the instructor. Offered on demand.
1 credit

CLC 1000: Introduction to College Math, Calhoun Learning Center
This course provides a review of basic operations with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions, as well as algebraic expressions and operations of polynomials. Ratios and proportions, percents, square roots, and sets are covered. Additional topics include factoring of polynomials, linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations, and operations with rational expressions. Functions and quadratic equations will be introduced. This class is graded on a pass/no pass basis. Credits for this courses do not count toward GMC graduation requirements. This course may be a prerequisite for other GMC required courses.
3 credits



MUS (top)

MUS 1001: Elements of Music
This course is designed as an introduction to music for the general student. Basics of theory, notation, rhythm, and musical style will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of music into society and various cultures. No knowledge of music is required for this course.
3 credits

MUS 1003: College Chorale
College Chorale is open to all members of the student body as an opportunity for musical expression. The chorus will present performances of choral literature ranging from Latin a Capella to contemporary music. 4 required rehearsals/week.
1 credit per semester, maximum 8 credits per college career

MUS 1011: Music Appreciation
This course is intended to familiarize and acquaint the student with the joy and purpose of music in the society, both present and historical. Through lecture, discussion, listening, and research participation and multimedia the student will experience, first hand, the diversity and beauty of music from the past and present, and other cultures. Integrated learning through the mediums of the theatre and graphic arts will enhance the student’s perception of music and its vital role in human development. No prior knowledge of music is necessary.
3 credits

MUS 1130: Introduction to West African Djembe
This course will begin a journey that will take you to your fears and to your joys. The legacy of the drum master who brought West African rhythm to the United States will guide you in the language and technique of the drum, joining with a community for the nurturing of mind, body and spirit. Must have a full-sized djembe. This course is geared to the beginner.
3 credits

MUS 1132: Advanced West African Djembe
This course is a continuation of explorations in music. Students must have a full-sized djembe. Prerequisite: MUS 1130 Introduction to West African Djembe.
3 credits

MUS 2011: Vocal Ensemble: Cantorian
This advanced performing ensemble concentrates on music of the 15th to 17th centuries with some work by composers of the 20th century. Members will experience a more demanding performance load, including travel within New England. Prerequisites: Must be a member of Collegiate Chorale; entrance only through audition and permission of choral director.
1 credit

MUS 2021: Early American Work Songs of the Land and Sea
This course will explore the working man and woman of the seventeenth to the early twentieth century, along with the study of different ethnic groups that were a major work force in building this country. Song was used to help them get through the work day. Research will include sea shanties, African slave songs, and the work songs of the textile worker, cowboy, miner, lumberjack, railroad builder and the chain gang.
3 credits

MUS 2053: Special Topics
This seminar course deals with specific themes, stylistic periods, or genres of music. The course is designed to meet the particular needs of students, or the particular interests and abilities of instructors, and is offered when circumstances make it appropriate. It is given a specific subtitle when listed in any semester’s class schedule. Students may take this course more than once when a different subtitle is used. Examples of courses previously offered are: Music of World Cultures: Reflecting Green Mountain College’s international emphasis, this course examines music from cultures around the globe, including Eastern as well as Western traditions, tribal music, and Native American music. Music in the rock Era: A chronological tour from the Blues through the ‘90s.
3 class hours

Studio Courses in Music
Private instruction in piano, voice, strings, winds or other instruments are offered by music faculty each term. Not all disciplines are offered every term. Please confer with the music office to receive current offerings in any given term. One term recital each semester of study. Registration for these courses must be completed during add/drop week. All studio courses and Applied recital carry a fee. Rates are established yearly. Note: Any student may register for Applied Music courses. Only those students who are Visual and Performing Arts majors with a concentration in music are required to complete any of these courses.

MUS 2061: Concert Band
The Green Mountain College/Community Concert Band provides GMC students and area community musicians the opportunity to perform traditional concert band and wind ensemble literature. Founded in the academic year 2000-2001, the band rehearses on Wednesday evenings, culminating in a major performance at the end of each semester. Musical repertoire has included music by Holst, Granger, R.V. Williams, Copland, and transcriptions by Handel, Corelli, and various other composers.
1 credit

MUS 2062: Jazz Ensemble
Students meet during weekly sessions to prepare, experiment, and perform a wide range of jazz repertoire, from standards to modern.
1 credit

MUS 2063: Guitar Studio I: Fundamentals and Ensemble
Guitar Studio I is a “hands-on” introduction to practical music theory on the fret-board. Students will learn the fundamentals of music theory relating to the guitar. By the end of the course, they will perform as an ensemble. Performance of written music allows a different level of control and complexity than is generally possible in an improvised setting; no one can “fake it.” Prerequisite: Ability to read music or prior familiarity with the guitar.
3 credits

MUS 3001: Music Theory & Composition
Traditionally, composers turn to tonal harmony when writing music. This course is intended to be a study of tonal harmony that has retained its validity from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. Based on this, the student will gain the tools necessary to analyze music scores and compose. In addition to applied theory and composition, the student will study and compare the procedures and writing styles of composers through the centuries. When appropriate the students will have the opportunity to have their compositions performed by various ensembles on campus. Prerequisite: MUS 1001 Elements of Music.
3 credits

MUS 4001: Applied Recital
The student will present a public recital of no less than one hour during the fall or spring semester. A recital committee will be chosen by the student and head of the music division. Repertoire and length for the program will be subject to review three weeks prior to performance date. Rates established yearly. Prerequisite: At least four sections of applied music and successful board jury.
3 credits



NRM (top)

NRM 1001: Introduction to Natural Resources Management
This course is presented as an introduction into the field of natural resources management. Students will be exposed to the range of disciplines contributing to effective natural resources management and will learn of the variety of career options in the field. Prerequisite: None.
3 credits

NRM 2015: Natural Resources Field Experiences
This field-based course allows the students to engage in applied natural resource issues and problems. Students will visit multiple sites over a two-week time period. Each site will allow the students to participate in specific projects spanning the fields of forestry, wildlife management, fisheries, and recreation planning. Students will become proficient in several measurement techniques including timber cruising, wildlife population modeling, GIS, and visitor surveys.
3 credits

NRM 2020: Data Analysis and Modeling
This course is intended to build competency in quantitative skills in the field of natural resources management. Specifically, students will learn descriptive and inferential statistical tests in addition to managing data sets to solve applied problems. Further, students will learn how to use natural resources data to model natural and social systems. Collectively the statistical analyses and modeling will provide a foundation for being able to describe and summarize complex relationships and systems.
3 credits

NRM 3065: Hunting: History, Ethics & Management
To kill or not to kill, that is the question. Hunting in North America today is a decidedly different enterprise than that which our forebears practiced even up to one hundred years ago. Hunting has shifted from a practice borne out of utilitarian necessity to an endeavor based on choice and leisure preference. It has grown from a rural chore to a full-fledged recreational industry with superstores, luxury guided vacation packages, and a full slate of ESPN programming. This course will trace the history of hunting, the ethical debates surrounding it, and the current wildlife management models built upon hunting pressure.
3 credits

NRM 3075: Silviculture NRM 3075
This class represents a study of ecologically-based decisions and practices designed to achieve a range of objectives related to forest management. Students will begin by learning how trees grow and forests develop such that they can determine how different treatments will affect residual trees and stands. Further, students will consider how different silvicultural prescriptions are used to produce timber and non-timber forest benefits. Attention will be given to issues of forest health, biodiversity, soil, and water resources as well as their effect on broader social, economic, and ecological issues.
3 credits

ENV/NRM 3082: Forest Policy & Management
In this course, students will examine the causes and consequences of past policies aimed to promote the long-term economic and ecological health of forest ecosystems. Students will learn about the political institutions and parties involved in the creation and implementation of forest policies at the local, state, national, and international levels. Contemporary issues related to forest management to be covered may include private lands issues, community-based conservation, woody biomass-to-energy initiatives, climate change and carbon sequestration, wilderness policy and management, and urban forestry. Through field trips to local forests, conversations with forestry professionals, and course assignments, students will gain deeper understandings of what sustainable forestry policies might look like in the northeastern United States.
3 credits

NRM 4022: Integrated Resource Planning
This course presents concepts, methods, and tools essential to the development of effective integrated resource management plans. Student will select a resource planning area, and working in interdisciplinary teams, prepare an integrated resource plan for implementation. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.
3 credits

NRM 4025: Resource Impacts and Management
This course addresses the inevitable result of introducing recreation participation into natural areas. Attention will be given to the study of the four major categories of resource impact: soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife. Students will also participate in a resource monitoring and data collection project. Prerequisite: REC 1000 Introduction to Recreation & Outdoor Studies or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

NRM 4030: Environmental Conflict Management
The natural resource base is contested terrain in a number of aspects. Public land supports many competing uses. Resource activities on private lands often affect public goods and welfare. This course is designed to address the processes available for mitigating environmental disputes. Specific attention will be given to the role of government as an agent of the people. Prerequisite: ENV 2011 Public Policy and the Environment or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

NRM 4051: Natural Resources Management Seminar
This seminar-style course is essentially the capstone course for the major. Students would be expected to undertake an original research project that draws on their educational experiences to date. Additionally, students will engage in discussions involving current issues and management challenges.
3 credits

NRM 4052: Natural Resources Capstone and Exam
This course is the capstone of the NRM major. Students will conduct a thorough self-evaluation of their progress through the NRM program. In addition, students will prepare a portfolio of professional work in advance of seeking full-time employment. Finally, the culminating aspect of this course is a series of exams, both oral and written, developed to test the student’s achievement of the NRM program goals.
1 credit

NRM 4053: Natural Resources Internship
This experience is designed to be completed during a student’s junior or senior year. Students work with an approved agency/organization involved in natural resources management. Students must document 120 hours worth of work and complete weekly reports in addition to a Special Project. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 50% of the NRM major curriculum requirements.
3 credits



PHI (top)

PHI 1001: Philosophic Reflections on the Cultural Environment
This course is an introduction to philosophy that explores philosophical problems as they emerge from reflection on basic human practices that are part of our cultural environment, such as science, religion, morality and politics. Through critical evaluation of conflicting claims issuing from these dominant features of our cultural environment, students will acquire an understanding of standard positions on topics including the existence of God, the nature of morality, and the extent of our knowledge of the natural world. Throughout the course, students will develop their own views on philosophical problems and examine the likely environmental impact of holding such views.
3 credits

PHI 2000/3000: Topics in Philosophy
This course explores a variety of topics in philosophy. Students may repeat the course whenever a new topic is offered.
3 credits

PHI/REL 2003: Philosophy of Religion
A consideration of the philosophical basis and implications of religious belief and theological formulations. Such questions as the existence of God, the problem of evil, religious experience and language, and the nature of faith are discussed. May be taken as REL 2003.
3 credits

PHI 2009/REL 2015: Religious Beliefs & Atheism
A study of classical atheism examining the philosophy of such thinkers as Feuerbach, Freud, Nietzsche, Russell, Sartre and Ayer. Religious responses to atheism and agnosticism from diverse points of view will also be discussed. May be taken as REL 2015.
3 credits

PHI 2011: Topics in 19th through 21st Century Philosophy
A survey of the work of key figures in 19th through 21st century philosophy. Topics such as the nature of truth, the range of human freedom and the validity of traditional ethics will be explored through the works of Nietzsche, James, Dewey, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Rorty, and Putnam, among others. Students should acquire a basic understanding of the Continental, American, and analytic traditions in recent philosophy.
3 credits

PHI/REL 2013: Philosophies of Being Human
A study of the way in which human beings and human nature have been defined through the ages from the early Greek philosophers and Hebrew thinkers to modern interpretations. Special emphasis will be given to practical implications of modern psychological, philosophical, and religious theory. May be taken as REL 2013.
3 credits

PHI 2021: Logic
Introduction to Logic is a study of informal reasoning and an introduction to symbolic logic. The course moves through a graduated series of skills, such as recognizing arguments, analyzing their structure, representing them in formal ways, and testing their validity.
3 credits

PHI 2031: Business Ethics
Students will study moral and ethical issues, which relate to problems in business. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, the responsibilities of business to employees and the responsibilities of employees to business and ethical issues in economic systems with primary emphasis on capitalism. Particular emphasis will be placed on the social responsibilities of business, including quality of products, truth in advertising, and environmental concerns. Case studies will be used extensively throughout the course.
3 credits

PHI 3007: Topics in Social and Political Philosophy
This course will explore key issues in sustaining a legitimate, healthy, well-ordered society. Students will focus on questions such as: What uses of power are legitimate in a social group? Can religious, social, and ideological diversity contribute to a healthy social group? How can trust be built and maintained in a social group? Timely issues will provide case studies for social-political theories.
3 credits

PHI 3009: Philosophy of Science
A systematic and critical study of the methodologies of the social and natural sciences, including an analysis of their presuppositions, sources, concepts, and aims. This course also examines problems about the intellectual and ethical limitations of science: to what extent does science give us objective knowledge and to what extent should research be restrained on ethical grounds? This course is recommended for students in the humanities and for students in the sciences who wish to reflect on the scientific enterprises.
3 credits

PHI 3011: Topics in Ancient Philosophy
A survey of the work of key figures in ancient philosophy. Topics such as the nature of truth and reality, the identification of the virtues and the role of friendship in a good life will be explored through the works of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus and the Stoics. Students will acquire a basic understanding of key metaphysical, ethical and political debates that informed the Greek world.
3 credits

PHI 3012: Topics in Modern Philosophy
A survey of the work of key figures in modern philosophy. Topics such as the sources and extent of knowledge, language and its impact on knowledge, and the nature of ethics will be explored through the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. Students will acquire a basic understanding of the rationalist and empiricist traditions in modern philosophy.
3 credits

PHI/EDU 3013: Philosophy of Education
This course explores the fundamental question of the place of public education in a liberal democracy. The goal is for students to draw on important philosophical ideas to construct a carefully reasoned position on public education. Authors and arguments from a range of philosophical traditions will be applied to case studies of contemporary educational practices, policies, and proposed reforms. Skills of analysis will be developed through written and oral exercises. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

PHI/REL 3023: Asian Philosophies
How do ancient and contemporary Asian philosophers think about human nature, the natural environment, ethics, politics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and religious practices? This course explores Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Zen, and Shintoism from the perspective of ancient texts and modern critical responses. These worldviews are further experienced via cultural traditions such as literature, film, poetry, music, calligraphy, visual arts, and architecture.
3 credits

PHI 3025/ENV 3026: Animal Ethics
What is the appropriate ethical relationship between humans and nonhuman animals? This course is a systematic study of animal ethics, a field that has emerged as a response to the profound impact of human practices on other species. Topics will include animal experimentation, hunting, bushmeat, livestock agriculture, landscape sustainability, biodiversity, companion animals, vegetarianism, activism, suffering, animal intelligence, animal cultures, animal emotions, animal rights law, and the tension between animal rights and environmental ethics.
3 credits

PHI 3030/WST 3030: Feminist Philosophy
This course is a survey of the perspectives and issues of feminist and gender theory in philosophy, including ethics, social-political theory, ecofeminism, metaphysics, religion, philosophy of science, aesthetics, and theories of knowledge. Topics will include historical and contemporary philosophic theories by and about women, as well as social and political issues concerning a plurality of gendered perspectives.
3 credits

PHI/ELA 3041: Ethical Theory
This course explores the complexity of moral situations and a wide range of responses through consideration of historical theories and contemporary empirical research. The central focus will be the ethical dimension of choices that impact ourselves and our natural and social environments, with an eye toward developing our own best theories and practices as we grapple with issues from love, sex, friendship, and happiness to poverty, social injustice, war, and environmental degradation.
3 credits

PHI 3045: Environmental Philosophy
An intensive exploration of selected environmental issues which will focus on contemporary philosophers. Topics such as wilderness preservation, environmental restoration, and the loss of biodiversity will receive detailed treatment, as students clarify their values and develop their own well-reasoned views.
3 credits

PHI 3090: Internship in Philosophy
This course offers members of the Philosophy major the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge and skills in a practical experience. Under the direction of an advisor, a student may arrange an internship that will make substantive use of coursework in the Philosophy program. Evaluative reports will be completed by both the student and his/her off-campus supervisor, and assessment of the student’s performance will be completed by the student’s advisor. Prerequisite: permission of the academic advisor and the Philosophy program Director.
1-3 credits

PHI 4000: Senior Seminar in Philosophy: Down the Rabbit Hole
This seminar is an in-depth adventure in philosophy, open to any junior or senior with at least two prior courses in philosophy. The topic will be one not recently covered in detail at GMC. Students will develop and assess their cumulative knowledge by plumbing the depths of a question that has puzzled philosophers from ancient times to the 21st century, such as: "What is the relationship between mind and body?" "Is reality ultimately One (a uni-verse), or Many (a multi-verse)?" "Is there such a thing as Truth?" "Are God and Goodness just ideas manufactured to keep us in line?" We will emphasize informal conversation and formal writing. A flexible syllabus and a substantial research project will let us challenge each other to deepen our philosophical understanding. Students are encouraged to save all philosophy course materials in expectation of this opportunity for intensive self-reflection.
3 credits

PHI 4011: Philosophy of Law
An analysis of the major philosophical issues concerned with legal concepts such as “liberty”, “justice”, “responsibility”, and “law” itself. The course will study historically significant treatments of these topics as well as current discussions of them.
3 credits

PHI 4090: Senior Thesis in Philosophy
This course involves individualized research with a member of the philosophy program. Each student will read a significant body of philosophical work and produce a thesis that will be evaluated by the philosophy faculty member and one faculty member outside of the philosophy program. The thesis work will culminate in a defense. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a proposal approved by the Program Director of Philosophy. Prerequisite: Senior standing and a proposal approved by the Program Director of Philosophy.
3 credits

PHI 4099: Honors Thesis in Philosophy
This course involves individualized research with a member of the philosophy program. Each student will read a significant body of philosophical work and produce an honors thesis that will be defended in a public presentation. Prerequisite: A successful petition to be considered for honors in philosophy.
3 credits



PSY (top)

PSY 1003: Introduction to Psychology
This course serves as a general introduction to psychology as the science of the mind and behavior, and as such, is a survey of the different specialties and approaches within the broad field of psychology. Topics include development, learning, and aspects of mental health.
3 credits

PSY 2015: Special Topics in Psychology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. Topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 2034: Theories of Personality
This course introduces students to a number of perspectives related to the development of the adult personality offered by prominent psychologists). Topics in measurement are also included. Prerequisites: PSY 1003 Introduction to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 2041: Human Development I: Infancy through Pre-Adolescence
An introduction to the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and personality development of the child from the pre-natal through pre-adolescent periods with a focus on major theoretical perspectives and current research in the field. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 2042: Human Development II: Adolescence through Later Adulthood
Major theoretical perspectives, current psychological research, and literary works will form the basis for a study of the developing, growing, maturing human individual. Special emphasis will be placed on human potential for full actualization. Prerequisites: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 2057: Positive Psychology
Positive Psychology deals with an area of psychology which is concerned with human potential, resilience and the prevention of disorders. The course will examine current research in the area as well as the history of the way psychology has progressed from dealing almost exclusively with the disease model to a current emphasis on wellness. Prerequisites: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology, or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 2063: Biological Bases of Behavior
An introduction to the relationships between physiological processes and behavior, this course presumes no prior knowledge of biology on the part of the student. Beginning with a basic exposition of the nervous system, the hormonal system and evolution, the course considers the effects of psychoactive drugs, the processing of information by the nervous system, and the interaction of biological and environmental factors that effect behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 3009: Psychopharmacology
This course will cover all major classes of drugs that humans consume and abuse. We will focus on the effects of these substances on our bodies and explore the influence of both set and setting as determinants of drug action. Issues of treatment and prevention of abuse will also be discussed. Overall, we will encounter the complexities of human drug consumption on biological, psychological, and social levels. Prerequisite: 2063 Biological Bases of Behavior.
3 credits

PSY 3011: Social Research I
This course, the first in a two semester sequence, provides an introduction to research design, measurement, and analysis including descriptive and inferential statistics, the elements of hypothesis testing, and issues of validity and reliability. Students will make extensive use of SPSS as they learn to analyze data and interpret results. They will use current literature in psychological and social research as they explore the structure and function of the components of professional journal articles. Prerequisites: Completion of ELA math or Level IV math placement or permission of instructor.
4 credits

PSY 3012: Perception
This course will focus on the human visual system and the phenomena of consciousness such as the perception of color, depth, objects, and motion. We will study the neural correlates as well as the theories of visual perception. We will relate our study to every-day experience and to clinical disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Into to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 3013: Abnormal Psychology
A systematic study of human behavior disorders. The role of the individual and of society in the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of abnormal behavior is given special emphasis. Prerequisite: PSY 2034 Theories of Personality or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 3014: Social Research II
The second course in a two semester sequence, this course provides opportunities for student generated research projects that involve a significant literature review, the collection and analysis of data using SPSS, and the production of a professional-style journal article in APA format. Students will be familiar with correlations and inferential statistics including ANOVA, regression, effect size, the use of post-hoc techniques, as well as non-parametric techniques including chi square. Prerequisite: PSY 3011 Social Research I.
4 credits

PSY 3015: Special Topics in Psychology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. The topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY/SOC 3023: Social Psychology
An examination of individual and group responses to social influence. Emphasis is on major theories, research methods, and current research topics in social psychology. This course may also be taken as Sociology 3023. Prerequisites: PSY 1003 Introduction to Psychology and one 2000 level PSY course.
3 credits

PSY 3043: Psychology of Aging
This course will focus on the physiological, cognitive, and social-psychological changes as we age and the factors that influence them. Both research data and real life examples will be integrated into a greater picture of what it is like to be an older adult in the United States and in other parts of the world. The images of older adults in the literature and the media and how they shape our own expectations of aging will also be taken up. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Introduction to Psychology.
3 credits

PSY 3063: Independent Research I
With the assistance and advice of a faculty mentor, the student will investigate a topic or issue of particular interest using one of the methods available in the social science; e.g. experimentation, survey, content analysis. The results of the research will be presented in a formal paper in the style of a journal article. Prerequisite: PSY 3014 Social Research II and Permission.

PSY 4003: Independent Research II
With the assistance and advice of a faculty mentor, the student will investigate a topic or issue of particular interest using one of the methods available for research: e.g. experimentation, survey, content analysis. The results of the research will be presented in a formal paper in the style of an APA journal article. Prior to registration for this course, the student must fill out an application and obtain the permission of a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Social Research II and permission of the instructor.
3 credits

PSY 4005: Counseling & Psychotherapy
This course provides students with an opportunity to understand the therapeutic process from various perspectives, that of the counselor or psychotherapist, that of the consumer of counseling or psychotherapy services, that of the scientist concerned with the effects and benefits of the therapeutic process. As an introduction to the field, this course in no way prepares students to engage in counseling and psychotherapy, which would require far more training and education. As a senior level course, however, the course assumes a broad knowledge of various theoretical perspectives and a broad background of study in psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 4007: Advanced Research Methods & Statistics
Students will immerse themselves in all stages of the scientific process. The enhancement of critical thinking skills and sound scientific methodology will be emphasized. In addition to class research projects, students will design and execute their own independent research projects. Students will statistically analyze data and write papers in APA format. Prerequisite: PSY 1003 Introduction to Psychology and PSY 3014 Social Research II, and Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 4011: Supervised Field Placement in Psychology
This course involves 120 hours of participation, observation, and preparation for work in an off-campus institutional setting under close faculty supervision. Students will record observations in a weekly journal, conduct a comprehensive final project related to their work at the institution, write a formal paper describing their work and the institution, and discuss their experiences with fellow classmates. Students will meet on a weekly basis with the course instructor and fellow students for guidance, ongoing assessment, and discussion related to their experiences. In addition, students will meet with the course instructor on a weekly basis for individual supervision. Final evaluation by the course instructor will include an evaluation by the student’s on-site supervisor. Prerequisites: PSY 1003 Intro to Psychology, PSY 3013 Abnormal Psychology, PSY 4005 Counseling Psychotherapy, or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 4015: Special Topics in Psychology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. The topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor. This course will satisfy the requirement of course electives within the division at the 4000 level. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY 4021: Senior Seminar
This course provides an opportunity for psychology members to explore, in depth, topics of current or historical importance to the discipline. The topic will change and the course may be taken a second time as an upper-level elective. Normally taken in the senior year, it may be taken by junior psych majors with the permission of the instructor. It may be taken by non-majors only with the permission of the instructor.
3 credits

PSY/WST 4022: Psychology & Gender
This course will facilitate an examination of gender as it exists in our lives, as a cultural construct having profound psycho-social implications and as an object of theoretical discourse. By means of a close study of primary texts, attention will be given to historical transformations of concepts of gender in psychology since Freud. Prerequisite: PSY 3034 Theories of Personality or permission of instructor.
3 credits

PSY/EDU 4031: Assessment and Management of Behavior
The course includes presentation and intensive discussion of learning approaches based on respondent and operant conditioning paradigms in classroom and clinic venues. Legal and ethical issues pertaining to behavior modification techniques, including IEP development, permissible and prohibited techniques of behavior modification and case management are covered. Consideration is given to such topics as token economies, modeling, desensitization, punishment and approaches to behavioral problems. Required of all education majors. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker.
3 credits



REC (top)

REC 0077: Sailing
The intention of this course is to transform a participant with little or no former sailing experience into a safe and confident skipper of small sailing craft. The course is designed to provide a safe environment for students to experience sailing and see if it is something they would like to pursue further. Most of class time will be spent on the water using a variety of boats. The class is limited to ten students. The experience will definitely be challenging and hopefully fun. The place where wind meets water is powerful. You will learn to move in this place.
1 credit

REC 1000: Introduction to Recreation & Outdoor Studies
This is the introductory course to the professional field of recreation and outdoor studies. Particular attention will be given to the historical foundations of leisure, recreation, and play; the emergence of outdoor recreation in American and global society; the roles of public (federal, state, and local) and private (for- and not-for-profit) providers of outdoor recreation; current issues and trends in the field; and career opportunities and professionalism. This course serves as a prerequisite to REC 4053 Internship.
3 credits

REC 1002: Essentials of Scuba – Level I
This course combines the Open Water and Advanced Open Water Certification programs of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). The course content teaches the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to dive with a buddy, and upon completion, independent of supervision. The course combines classroom, pool, and open-water participation to successfully meet certification requirements. Other topics include diver safety, aquatic environment, health for diving, programming, teamwork, presentation skills, research projects, and career opportunities in the dive industry. Requires additional course fee.
Prerequisites: Students must meet PADI medical requirements and successfully complete a watermanship assessment.
3 credits

REC 1003: Essentials of Scuba – Level II
This course combines the Rescue Diver, Enriched Air “Nitrox” Diver, and Emergency First Responder Certification programs of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). Students learn to look beyond themselves to consider the safety and well being of other divers through problem prevention, observation skills, and management of emergencies. Other topics include scenarios, mock rescues, physics/physiology of diving, research, teamwork, presentation skills, research projects, and career development. Requires additional course fee.
Prerequisites: Students must meet PADI medical requirements and have successfully completed PADI Advanced Open Water Diver or REC 1002 Essentials of Scuba – Level I.
3 credits

REC 1005: Essentials of Scuba – Level III
This course follows the PADI curriculum for the Professional Scuba Diver. Upon successful completion, student will earn the Diver Propulsion Vehicle, Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialist, Deep Diver Specialist, and Dry Suit Diver certifications. Requires additional course fee. Prerequisites: Students must meet PADI medical and dive requirements and have successfully completed PADI Rescue Diver and PADI Advanced Open Water Diver or REC 1003 Essentials of Scuba – Level II.
3 credits

REC 1041: Outdoor Living Skills
This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills necessary for living comfortably in the natural environment. Students will have the opportunity to develop safe and efficient camp management functions, trip planning, water treatment, navigation basics, food systems, knots, shelters, clothing and weather assessment, and have the chance to apply these skills during field experiences. 3 credits

REC 2013: Wilderness First Aid
This course will be designed to meet the needs of front country and backcountry citizen responders and trip leaders with the knowledge and skills necessary to care for minor injuries and medical emergencies until professional help arrives. Training includes CPR for Adult & Child. Certificates will be issued if all requirements are met.
3 credits

REC 2014: Self-Designed Programming Lab
This independent study opportunity allows the student to design and implement his/her own recreational program experience. Sponsorship by a department faculty member is required.
Prerequisites: REC 2026 Program Planning and Leadership for Outdoor Recreation.
1-3 credits

REC 2015: Outdoor Emergency Care
Outdoor Emergency Care is a performance-based emergency care educational program of the National Ski Patrol. The primary focus of the program reflects the individual’s need for training in the outdoor environment. It is the standard of training adopted to meet the emergency care requirements of an outdoor emergency care technician. The American Red Cross Professional Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Program will be presented as part of the course content. Requires an additional course fee.
4 credits

REC 2025: Introduction to Therapeutic Adventure
A critical examination of the process of therapeutic adventure programming from both a historical and philosophical perspective. This course involves an overview of the therapeutic adventure program planning process. Introduction to therapeutic adventure intervention strategies used to restore, remediate, and/or rehabilitate individuals with various illnesses and/or disabilities.
3 credits

REC 2026: Program Planning & Leadership for Outdoor Recreation
This course provides a foundational understanding of program planning and leadership, which includes delivery, needs assessments, group management, participant requirements, participant physical and emotional safety; human development, special needs, advertising, and evaluation. Specific attention will be given to the history and development of leadership theory and practice. Topics range from leadership styles, models, levels of communication, conflict management, group interaction, to leader competency and moral and ethical leader practices. During the lab portions of this course, student will gain hands-on experience delivering programs.
4 credits

REC 2027: Outdoor Program Design and Management
This course provides a foundational understanding of program planning and leadership, which includes delivery, needs assessments, group management, participant requirements, participant physical and emotional safety, human development, special needs, advertising, and evaluation. Specific attention will be given to the history and development of leadership theory and practice. Topics range from leadership styles, models, levels of communication, conflict management, group interaction, to leader competency and moral and ethical leader practices. During the lab portions of this course students will gain hands-on experience delivering programs for a variety of populations.
3 credits

REC 2033: Foundations of Adventure Education
This course examines the growth and developmental aspects of adventure programming focusing on the adventure education movement in America, including history and foundations, models, theories, participation patterns, outcomes/benefits, sponsoring agencies, public and private resources, salient literature, contemporary issues, trends, and professionalization of a discipline.
3 credits

REC 2041: Camp Counseling and Youth Leadership
Beginning with the history of youth leadership and organized camping, this course provides for the application of specified theories skills and knowledge for camp counseling and youth leadership for the development of field-based programs. This includes: (1) creation of safe social, emotional, and physical environments; (2) teaching and program strategies; (3) counseling methods; and (4) behavior management. The requirements include a one-week residential camp field experience as part of the course.
4 credits

REC 2062: Outdoor Leadership Practicum
This course develops outdoor leadership skills through education theory, risk assessment, and goal creation and attainment. Students develop an operational language to build teaching progressions, utilize accident analysis, and learn the intricacies of instructor positioning. This course encourages students to utilize leadership to create positive challenge and change for outdoor program participants.
3 credits

REC 2063: Adventure Group Processing and Facilitation
This course addresses the need for the student and future practitioner to understand and demonstrate the ability to build effective working relationships with future participants. The course will emphasize the development of strategies and techniques to bring about participant change in field-based settings.
3 credits

REC 2315: Wilderness First Responder
Each spring students have the opportunity to earn a wilderness first responder (WFR) certification on campus through the Wilderness Medical Training Center. Unlike Outdoor Emergency Care, which is the premier ski industry medical certification, WFRs are trained to provide medical assistance in backcountry situations requiring both stabilization and potentially extended treatment of illness/injury. Students seeking careers employing adventure activities beyond ski resorts would be best served with WFR training.
3 credits

REC 3000: Essentials of Scuba – Level IV
This course follows the PADI curriculum for the Professional Scuba Diver. Upon successful completion and approved application to PADI, students will earn the Divemaster certification. Requires additional course fee. Prerequisites: Students must meet PADI medical and dive requirements and have successfully completed PADI Rescue Diver or REC 1005 Essentials of Scuba – Level III.
3 credits

REC 3002: Essentials of Mountain Biking
This course will isolate three primary learning domains: a) environment b) outdoor technique; and c) instructional/site management strategies. Environmental impact items include: ecological trail design, land use, permitting and agencies working towards the sustainable future of mountain biking participation. Developing strong outdoor skills is the foundation of being an effective instructor. This course will employ multiple labs to isolate multiple riding techniques and maintenance acumen. Further, students will be required to develop lessons incorporating effective instructional strategies among a variety of biking topics and group management techniques. Lastly, site management is the cornerstone of the adventure education degree program; mountain biking offers an instructor situation not offered by any other essentials. These dynamics will be isolated and investigated.
3 credits

REC 3004: Essentials of International Mountaineering
Students will learn the fundamentals of running international mountaineering expeditions during this 20-day program in the Ishinca Valley of Peru. Curriculum related to technical mountaineering skills including rope-team travel, ice-axe and crampon use, glacier rescue, protection placement, movement skills, and camp craft. Students will gain substantial insight about mountaineering-related considerations, such as risk management, glaciology, geology, meteorology, nutrition, high-altitude physiology, and Leave-No-Trace techniques. In addition, students will learn about leadership, communication, and expedition behavior while interacting with locals, navigating the permit process, managing group dynamics, and working with peers to achieve group goals. The course will culminate with a student-led attempt on Toclleraju (19,790), one of the most stunning peaks in the Cordillera Blanca. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
3 credits

REC 3006: Essentials of Rock & Ice Climbing
This course covers a variety of climbing skills including but are not limited to: climbing safety, approaching climbs, anchors, belaying, escaping the belay, repelling, climbing techniques, and function/liabilities of climbing equipment. Further, students will learn the subtleties of site management as it pertains to climbing activities. In addition to field work, students will investigate trends in climbing, historical foundations of climbing and the ecological impacts of climbing participation Requires additional course fee. Prerequisites: REC 1041 Outdoor Living Skills or permission of instructor.
3 credits

REC 3007: Essentials of Winter Mountain Travel
This course is designed to provide students with essential skills to participate in alpine and mountain-based activities leading up to winter expedition mountaineering. Students will be given opportunities for the application of the principles of responsible use of the environment for recreation and leisure including leadership, teamwork, decision making, and problem solving with the intent of minimizing human impact while maximizing safety and enjoyment. Course content will build on the REC 1041 Outdoor Living Skills course to include the historical basis of mountaineering and a continuum of skill development necessary for winter camping, avalanche safety, snowshoeing, Nordic skiing, crampon technique, and mountain rescue. Requires an additional course fee.
Prerequisite: REC 1041 Outdoor Living Skills.
3 credits

REC 3008: Essentials of Challenge Course Technology
This course provides participants with a model for an integrated challenge course program that emphasizes the development of physical, intellectual, and social skills in a safe, supportive and challenging environment. Particular emphasis is placed on ropes course technician skills and the adventure learning process of experiential education following the standards of the Association for Challenge Course Technology.
Requires additional course fee.
3 credits

REC 3009: Essentials of Paddling
This course is designed to provide students with essential skills to participate in river canoeing/kayaking and coastal kayaking. In field experiences, students will be given opportunities to explore our local rivers and develop, decision making, and problem solving with the intent of minimizing human impact while maximizing safety and enjoyment during paddling activities. Course content will also explore the historical basis of paddlesport, important paddle organizations and instructor certification opportunities; particularly the American Canoe Association. Requires additional course fee.
Prerequisite: REC 1041 Outdoor Living Skills.
3 credits

REC 3012: Essentials of Scuba – Level V
This course follows the PADI curriculum for the Professional Scuba Diver. Upon successful completion and approved application to PADI, students will earn the Open Water Scuba Instructor certification. Requires additional course fee.
Prerequisites: Students must meet PADI medical and dive requirements and have successfully completed PADI Divemaster or Assistant Instructor, or REC 1005 Essentials of Scuba – Level III.
3 credits

REC 3021: Social and Psychological Dimensions of Leisure
This course primarily examines the significance of play, recreation, and leisure throughout the life cycle relative to the individual’s attitudes, values, behaviors, and use of resources. Theories of social psychology pertinent to individuals in the recreation field are explored through the examination of applicable leisure practices and research.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course may also be taken as SOC 3021.
3 credits

REC 3040: Adventure Education Programming Lab
The sophomore fall block is an immersive experience, which focuses on core skill set integration (human, outdoor, and educational skills). Working in concert with other courses in the block, the Adventure Education Programming Lab. affords students the opportunity to engage with a wide range of adventure activities, each providing unique site management challenges for instructors. Through observation, participation and reflection, the course is designed to bring students to a new level of insight relative to the skills requisite of effective adventure education.
3 credits

REC 3061: Special Topics in Environmental Recreation
This course focuses on specific themes revolving around the use of the natural environment for recreational pursuits. Students will be provided an opportunity to assess, analyze, and explore in depth, issues involving the recreational use of the environment. Students will be encouraged to develop and challenge their own ethics with respect to the recreational use of the environment. Emphasis will be placed on the use of critical thinking and improving communication skills, both written and oral. This course may also be taken as ENV 3061.
3 credits

REC 3062: Human Dimensions of Leadership
The purpose of this course is to expose students to the underpinnings of a professional life in adventure education. During a career students will build professional relationships with participants, coworkers and supervisors. This course examines the dynamics surrounding these relationships and prepares future professionals to engage with each productively through challenging paradigms and critical self-assessment.
Prerequisite: Junior standing
3 credits

REC 3066: Field Leadership Seminar
This course serves as the capstone field experience for all adventure education majors. Students are asked to develop 4-5 days of programming for a group outside GMC and employ all aspects of programming, instruction, risk management, and administrative functions associated with adventure programming. Students are required to demonstrate highly integrated human, outdoor and educational skills while operating their course.
Pre-requisites: Instructor approval and GMC fall block.
3 credits

REC 3071: Theories & Foundations of Adventure Therapy
This course is designed to introduce students to an overview of the theories and foundations of therapeutic adventure. Specifically this course will examine: adventure and wilderness therapy models, the therapeutic process, programming applications, processing experiences, research and the future of therapeutic adventure.
Prerequisites: REC 2025 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services, REC 2033 Foundations of Adventure Recreation.
3 credits

REC 3072: Practical Application of Therapeutic Adventure
This course is designed to give students information regarding the practical application of therapeutic adventure techniques. Different theories and methods utilized in the service of therapeutic practice including the identification of a presenting problem/ issue, and the selection of strategies of client management and methods of intervention will be explored. The lab component of this class is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the skills discussed in the practical application course through hands-on experiences. The students will be exposed to individual and group processing techniques, with a focus on the use of metaphors in the therapeutic process.
Prerequisites: REC 2025 Introduction to Therapeutic Adventure
3 credits

REC 3161: Philosophy of Recreation on Public Lands
This class is designed to expose the student to the philosophical premises of allocating public land and tax dollars for recreation. Also to be discussed are the assumptions that we (members of the American society) hold concerning our commitment to public resources and the responsibilities of those entrusted with managing those resources. Finally, the course would offer students a framework for how they may approach a job/career in natural resource-based recreation management working for a public agency.
3 credits

REC 3175: Eco-Tourism
This course is designed as a detailed entry into the field of ecotourism. Students will learn about the history, main concepts and guiding principles of ecotourism, with attention paid to both the ecological and human aspects of this travel option. Consideration will be given to understanding the motivations and expectations of ecotourists and the public and private providers of ecotourism opportunities. Trends in policy, government legislation, and green-marketing will also be discussed.
3 credits

REC 4010: Management of Outdoor & Adventure Programs
This course studies the management of outdoor and adventure programs. Topics include the use of public and private lands, basic understanding of the impact of use on the natural environment, review of biological and physical science concepts relative to land use, care of the environment, permits, staffing, supervision of staff, staff training, personnel issues, certification, scheduling, budgeting, risk management, insurance, marketing, logistical planning, strategic planning, public policy, access to outdoor resources, search and rescue.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

REC 4014: Camp & Youth Program Management
Camp & Youth Program Management is a complimentary course taken in conjunction with REC 4010 Management of Outdoor & Adventure Programs focusing on unique aspects of management associated with Camp and Youth Programs. Specifically, the course will examine organization, human resource, finance, insurance, health & sanitation, food service, transport, maintenance, safety, program sites, accreditation, licensing, and certification related to resident and day program management.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.
1 credit

REC 4035: Master Planning
This course will explore the master planning process for the recreation industry. Students will learn the components of a master plan, writing goals and objectives for master planning, stages and approaches to master planning, methods and procedures for master planning, environmental and sociological impacts of the master planning process, implementing and financing a master plan. Questionnaire research techniques, leading to a practical project in the master planning process will be included in the course.
3 credits

REC 4051: Recreation & Outdoor Studies Seminar
This course examines contemporary issues confronting the leisure service profession. Among the various topics to be discussed are professional philosophy, ethics, and development, as well as practical application of research. Students will be expected to utilize effectively the tools of communication, including technical writing, speech, and audiovisual techniques.
Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

REC 4053: Internship in Recreation & Outdoor Studies OR
Internship in Youth Development & Camp Management

The internship serves as the culmination of professional training and course work. A 6 credit internship consists of a minimum of 10 weeks and 400 hours of professional level work under direct supervision of a qualified recreation professional is required. Please consult The Internship Manual for further details.
Prerequisite: Vary according to specific degree requireme, or permission of instructor.
6 credits

Internships are typically completed the summer between the junior and senior years, or during the senior year. Students wishing to do an internship earlier than this must get special permission from the faculty internship supervisor. Pre-requisites: Students must complete 200 practicum hours, hold a major and minor certification, hold a WFR or OEC medical certification, and have a 2.5 major GPA in order to be eligible for enrollment in REC 4053.



REL (top)

REL 1010: Introduction to Shamanism
This will be an introductory course in core or universal Shamanism. The course will explore the history of shamanism as well as shamanic practices, knowledge and beliefs. As a class, we will work to incorporate components of our study into our personal life and the school community. We will divide our time between academic study of these topics and experiential learning. As a group we will examine questions relating Shamanism and the shamanic culture’s perspective with our modern society. We believe that the spiritual views which Shamanism cultivates offers new perspectives and insights on sustainability and our environmental mission.
3 credits

REL 2000: Topics in Religious Studies
This course explores a variety of topics in religious studies. Students may repeat the course whenever a new topic is offered.
3 credits

REL 2003: Philosophy of Religion
A consideration of the philosophical basis and implications of religious belief and theological formulations. Such questions as the existence of God, the problem of evil, religious experience and language, and the nature of faith are discussed.
3 credits

REL 2005: World Religions
Throughout history, people have attempted to explain the divine, and how and where human life and spirit intersect in the world. As human beings, we struggle to understand the events of our lives in a broader context, searching for meaning to make sense of it all. This course will examine the answers some people have found to their deepest questions, in the form of many of the world's religions. But through it all, you will be asked to take a closer look at your own spiritual pilgrimages and consider how they might influence your attitudes, actions and being.
3 credits

REL 2009: Stories of the Spirit
Stories, myths and teaching tales are a rich resource for understanding the spiritual lives of people past and present. This course will explore the stories associated with several world religions and indigenous spiritual traditions as well as encouraging students to reflect on the myths that guide heir lives and spiritual perspectives.
3 credits

REL 2013: Philosophies of Being Human
A study of the way in which human beings and human nature have been defined through the ages from the early Greek philosophers and Hebrew thinkers to modern interpretations. Special emphasis will be given to practical implications of modern psychological, philosophical, and religious theory.
3 credits

REL 2015 : Religious Beliefs & Atheism
A study of classical atheism examining the philosophy of such thinkers as Feuerbach, Freud, Nietzsche, Russell, Sartre and Ayer. Religious responses to atheism and agnosticism from diverse points of view will also be discussed.
3 credits

REL 2030: The Battle for God: Fundamentalism and Contemporary Life
This course is a study of fundamentalism and its impact upon contemporary culture, and an exploration of the roots and history of fundamentalist movements in religion. The clash of religious fundamentalism with scientific humanism will be studied along with the cultures, which are shaped by this conflict. Also explored will be the nature of truth, reason and revelation as a foundation for understanding the conflict, as well as the importance of religious experience and modernity in the shaping of a contemporary world-view that shapes personal positions and loyalties. Some attention will be given to fundamentalism in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.
3 credits

REL 2031: Investigating the Bible: Ancient Texts in a New Perspective
This course is an introduction to the bible and its historical development examining representative texts and literary styles. Emphasis will be placed upon modern higher critical methods of biblical interpretation and the various contemporary uses of the bible by diverse faith communities. Attention will be given to contemporary interpretation methods which take the bible seriously but not literally. The religious value of the bible for contemporary faith positions will be examined.
3 credits

REL 2051: Civilization of India
This course is designed to introduce students to the rich and complex cultures and civilizations of India from ancient times to the present. We will examine the geography, society, politics, economy, and culture of India with particular emphasis on the religious traditions of Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Hinduism, and Islam as they developed in South Asia. The format of the course will emphasize discussion and student presentations.
3 credits

REL 3023 : Asian Philosophies
How do ancient and contemporary Asian philosophers think about human nature, the natural environment, ethics, politics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and religious practices? This course explores Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Zen, and Shintoism from the perspective of ancient texts and modern critical responses. These worldviews are further experienced via cultural traditions such as literature, film, poetry, music, calligraphy, visual arts, and architecture.
3 credits

REL 3053: Islamic World
This course examines the emergence and development of the Islamic world from its beginnings in seventh century Arabia until 1800. Special attention will be given to the life of Muhammad as well as the spiritual, ethical, and ritual dimensions of Islam. Highlights of the course include a visit to a mosque as well as reading the Qur’an.
3 credits



RHM (top)

RHM 1050: Resort CO-OP I
Performed at Killington. The student is given the opportunity to apply and interview for specified positions within The Killington Resort. These positions are classified as either “front of the house” (guest contact) or “back of the house” (non-guest contact) area. Once accepted into a particular Co-Op position, the student will experience job functions in that area. All Co-ops are paid at prevailing wages. Students are treated as Killington employees with all rights and privileges normally due to a Killington employee. The student is expected to adhere to all Killington policies and procedures.

The students meet as a class each week. The student is given a sequence of projects to complete over the term. The student also completes a term long “special project” that he/she develops in conjunction with his/her supervisor, subject to approval of the faculty. The student presents that project to the Killington Management team at the end of the term.

The student should also note that the Co-Op begins in mid December and runs through mid-March. Students will be expected to work a full (36-40 hour) week during that time (including Christmas Eve/Day, New Year’s Eve/Day, and Presidents’ Week). Work schedules will be arranged so that the students will have off, in order to attend class.

Formal evaluations and faculty/coordinator visits are completed for each student. The student also coordinates an entrance and exit interview with his/her direct supervisor, GMC faculty and the Killington Director of Training and Development. Should any student be separated from the Killington Resort for any disciplinary or policy reason, that student will automatically fail the course.
Course fees may be required
9 credits

RHM 1125: Introduction to Marketing
Applies basic marketing principles to the resort/hospitality industry in general and the destination property in specific. Topics include strategies for product and service offerings, seasonal pricing strategies, communication message, content, and placement as well as market segmentation. The concepts of product life cycle, resource allocation and relationship marketing strategies are also introduced. Students apply concepts to the Killington operations through projects and presentations.
Course fees may be required
3 credits

RHM 1375: Human Resource Issues in Hospitality & Resorts
An introduction to human resource management in the hospitality and resort industry. In addition to addressing the traditional human resource functions of sourcing, selection, development and evaluation, the course allows the student to view the resort in a competitive service industry with a seasonal (short term) part time employee base.
This course also covers the regulatory environment, and the special considerations of sourcing an international seasonal work force each year. Guest and employee injuries, bomb threats, natural disasters, and other unforeseen emergency management strategies are discussed. Legal and ethical concerns are addressed. Taught by senior Killington management.
3 credits

RHM 1425: MIS & Data Management
The system for collection and summation of data is explored within the hospitality property and destination resort setting. Special attention is paid to the seasonality of the business as well as the special requirements and timing for report generation. Students will also explore the special interrelationships of the resort guest-contact areas (base lodges operations, hotel lodging, time- share real estate, food service, retail, equipment/rental operations, activity/events) and the administrative support areas (human resources, finance, mountain operations, marketing and housekeeping/maintenance).
3 credits

RHM 1475: Financial & Budget Management
The student will be introduced to the key financial reports and systems within a hospitality and/or resort setting. This course approaches financial decision making from the view of a base lodge or general manager. Thus, emphasis is placed on the financial reporting system available to middle management and the decisions available to those managers. The concepts of CVP, yield management, budget preparation, forecasting, internal control and operational leverage are covered in addition to the traditional financial statement interpretation. This course uses “real life” examples and project assignments from the Killington and/or hospitality operations.
3 credits

RHM 1525: Introduction to Resort & Hospitality Operations
The history and psychological basis of the resort industry is explored. Students are also introduced to the operational areas of the destination property. Senior managers from The Killington Resort guide students in the understanding of the various operational areas and responsibilities of the resort management team. Special attention is paid to various national/international resorts and market segments, as students track particular resorts and market segments over the term. The global and environmental aspects of the resort industry are also explored.
Course fees may be required.
3 credits

RHM 1550: Food & Beverage Operations
Regardless of the geographic location, the activities or the seasonality of its business, all resorts and hospitality operations have lodging and/or food & beverage concerns. This course immerses the student into an understanding of those fundamental operations. The food and beverage component exposes the student to the process of food/beverage ordering, receiving, inventory control, preparation, service and evaluation. Concepts of cost control, menu design, function management, CVP and the like are also explored.
3 credits

RHM 2050: Resort CO-OP II
The student experience compliments the first Co-Op. If the student was in the “front” during Co-Op I, then he/she will be placed in the “back’ for Co-Op II. Same policies and structure applies as Co-Op I. Project and class assignments will be at a second year level. Certain students who show promise may be invited to take on additional supervisory responsibilities and projects. Course fees may be required.
9 credits

RHM 2125: Retail & Consumer Behavior
Retail operations are a critical component to the overall resort offering. This course examines the traditional theories of consumer behavior (buying behavior, purchase process, product attributes, etc) in light of the resort guest. The student also explores the retail strategies of atmospherics, inventory assortment, merchandising, store layout, pricing strategies and product placement within the store. Killington retail outlets are used for case illustration, research and student projects. Taught by senior Killington management. Course fees may be required.
3 credits

RHM 2150: Marketing Research for Hospitality & Resorts
Market research is a continual operation within the hospitality property and destination resort. This course allows the student to experience the marketing research process as both a project oriented as well as continual basis within the hospitality and/or resort operation. Students will develop and administer a variety of collection instruments, including surveys, focus groups, interviews and Internet polling. The students will experience a variety of data collection, analysis and interpretation. Projects will be assigned in conjunction with the Killington management team, which will allow the student to collect data, perform the analysis, make recommendations and present his/her findings to the Killington management team.
3 credits

RHM 2175: Events Planning
The examination of methods required in planning, coordinating, delivering and evaluating banquets and functions within the hospitality operation. The student will study the needs of various market segments, conventions, groups and individuals in order to execute a successful event within the constraints of a profitable hospitality operation. Events entail more than just food & beverage service. Students will need to consider the social, artistic and environmental aspects as well.
3 credits

RHM 3050: Resort Internship
The internship experience in the final year is student driven and developed in conjunction with the RLM faculty. The goal of the internship is to provide a focused experience in a destination resort setting that will lead to the student’s choice of a full time career. Thus the student should give ample time and thought to the location and type of experience that he/she desires for the internship.

The internship may be completed at Killington if both the student and the Resort agree. The internship may be completed at other national/international properties as well. There is no guarantee of stipend, wages or salary for the experience. Those decisions are between the resort property and the student.

The student will submit a proposal to the Resort & Hospitality Management faculty at least three (3) months prior to the experience. This proposal will include, but not be limited to, the job/position description, learning outcomes, project(s) to be completed and evaluation system. The proposal must also include a letter of support from the internship site, which includes the names, and positions of all supervisors, start/finish date and any other appropriate information. The student will not be allowed to register until the RHM faculty approves all such information.

Offered on a pass/fail basis. Students may petition the Program Director for a graded experience. Forms for the internship proposal and grading option are available from the Program Director.
3 credits

RHM 3220: Organizational Leadership
Since man first got together and organized for a given task (hunting food), someone in the group stepped forward to help direct and control the action of the group. What may have started as an informal delegation of authority for a simple group task has developed into a set of more formalized responsibilities in today’s organizations. But what makes a good leader? What is leadership all about? Where did it come from? How did leadership develop? Is leadership situational? Is it grounded in the individual? These and many other questions continue to surface as organizations change in the global complexity that surrounds us. This course seeks to explore the concept and history of leadership from early writers through the industrial era and ending up in today’s information age. The course will look at leadership theory through the writings of both academic theorists as well as organizational practitioners over that same time. Guest speakers will also shed light on leadership realities in today’s organizations
3 credits

RHM 3225: Hospitality & Resort Law
This course exposes the student to the legal and regulatory issues involved with managing the hospitality and/or resort property. Hospitality topics include hotel-guest relationships, rights of refusal, assumption of risk, dram shop acts, bailments, riparian rights, duties of guest safety, as well as food and liquor liability. Resort issues include, but are not limited to the permitting process, environmental regulations, as well as community and societal issues.
3 credits

RHM 3275: Green Development
This course is designed to expose the student to the impact of both (a) current resort operations and (b) planned resort development upon the natural and community environments. The student will explore the specialized requirements for resorts based on location, climate, activities and natural resources. The course will also develop a student’s understanding of the management responsibility for environmental impact analysis, project development, construction/site supervision and regulatory considerations. Taught by Killington senior management.
3 credits

RHM 3295: Resort & Hospitality Strategy
A senior “capstone” course in which the student is required to draw upon all parts of the curriculum, under pressure, to demonstrate his/her ability to think critically and communicate sound decisions in the management of resort and/or hospitality operations. The student will be asked to analyze and/or author case studies, make professional presentations on some aspect of strategy in a staff meeting setting and/or other appropriate vehicles to demonstrate the culmination of his/her knowledge.

The student will also need to successfully complete a comprehensive exam. This exam will be given over a series of classes and will cover all previous content from Resort or Hospitality Management courses.
3 credits

RHM 3325: Team Manager & Development
This course offers the RHM student team manager an opportunity to further develop her/his management abilities. The RHM team manager will be responsible for the successful operation of various activities and events throughout the academic year. This course is designed to help the student evaluate the success of those efforts with respect to her/his own management abilities.
3 credits

RHM 3575: Lodging Operations
This course provides an in-depth focus on the lodging component of hospitality operations. Topics include rooms portfolio management, forecasting and pricing decisions, integration with information technology, yield, ADR and RevPAR management, target market concerns, group business decisions, as well as operations management of the lodging property.
3 credits



SDE (top)

SDE 200G/201G: Progressive Program Level III Review
Please see the Progressive Program section of the Catalog for Level Review requirements.
3 credits

SDE 300G/301G: Progressive Program Level VI Review
Please see the Progressive Program section of the Catalog for Level Review requirements.
3 credits

SDE 3000: Independent Project
An independent study, research, work internship/externship project in support of an approved Self-Designed Major proposal. This course requires the sponsorship of a faculty advisor, although the work may be carried out under the direction of a staff member or a qualified off-campus professional. The course may be taken in units from 1 to 6 credits. (A maximum of 15 credits of SDE 3000 will be permitted.)

SDE 3050: Progressive Program Internship
This course offers members of the Progressive Program the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in a practical experience. Under the direction of an advisor, a student may arrange an internship that will make substantive use of coursework in the Progressive Program. Evaluative reports will be completed by both the student and his/her off-campus supervisor, and assessment of the student’s performance will be completed by the student’s advisor. Credit will be dependent upon the number of contact hours (consult the Program Director for guidelines). Note that students opting for a traditional major with an internship requirement ought to complete the internship in that program.
Prerequisite: permission of the academic advisor and the Progressive Program Director.
1-3 credits

SDE 400G/401G: Progressive Program Senior Study
Please see the Progressive Program section of the Catalog for Senior Study requirements.
12 credits

SDE 4000: Final Project
The final project for students with approved Self-Designed Major programs, this course of independent study will ordinarily be carried out under the supervision of the principal or alternate advisors and should demonstrate the accomplishment of the objectives in the student’s major proposal.
3-4 credits



SOC (top)

SOC 1001: Human Origins
What have humans and their ancestors been doing the last five million years? What did we look like and how did we act 4 million years ago, 1 million years ago, and 20,000 years ago? Did our minds evolve, as well as our bodies? How do we know? Did different “races” of humans evolve? When was the “creative explosion” that turned our species into religious, symbolic artists? How and when did we spread around the world? What have been the consequences of farming and congregating in cities? What are some of the issues facing contemporary indigenous people? This course will draw on evolutionary theory, paleoanthropology, archaeology, linguistics and cultural anthropology to explore and answer these questions.
3 credits

SOC 1002: Cultural Anthropology
Humans are cultural creatures, and in this course we will take a broad yet integrative view of how humans shape, and are shaped by, the social and cultural systems they inhabit. We will first use anthropological perspectives to explore the culture concept, a brief history of cultural anthropology, language and culture, and the cultural construction of race. We will then examine the cross-cultural variety of types of subsistence, kinship, marriage and households, and gender roles. The second half of the course employs a more psychological or cognitive perspective to examine how culture helps form meaningful identities, memories, symbols, rituals, and senses of place.
3 credits

SOC 1003: Social Problems
This course covers sociological theory and research about pressing difficulties in contemporary American society, including: poverty, crime, political abuse, and economic elites.
3 credits

SOC 1011: Introduction to Sociology
This course provides the student with a basic understanding of the place sociology fills among the social sciences, its areas of concern, limitations, and methodology. The student is introduced to the sociological way of looking at human experiences.
3 credits

SOC 2001: American Minorities
This course acquaints the student with the social processes underlying the interaction of racial and ethnic minority groups in contemporary society. Special attention is given to several prominent minority groups in contemporary society.
3 credits

SOC 2003: Independent Study in Sociology I
In this course, students conduct independent reading, research, or other projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor. They must complete the Independent Study application before registering. Independent studies are necessarily subject to availability of a faculty mentor.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
3-4 credits

SOC 2005: Women’s Studies
Women’s Studies uses an interdisciplinary approach to examining the experiences of women and their place in society. The course explores the meaning of sex and gender, gender role socialization, issues regarding women’s role and treatment in society, and the consequences for women. 3 credits

SOC 2007: Social Stratification
This course studies differentiation and ranking within societies. The theories of social stratification and the social processes by which inequality comes to be seen as legitimate, natural, or desirable will also be covered.
3 credits

SOC/WST 2013: Women Across Cultures
This course focuses on the status of women in various cultures, their needs and problems, priorities and potential. Different perspectives applicable to women’s lives and experiences are covered. Special emphasis is given to women in non-Western societies.
3 credits

SOC 2015: Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. The topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 2023: Marriage & the Family
This course acquaints the student with basic family concepts, their origins and impact on contemporary American society. Consideration is also given to dating, courtship, marriage, alternative lifestyles, and the future of the family.
3 credits

SOC 3000: Practicum I
This course involves 60 hours of participation and observation in an off -campus institutional setting under close faculty supervision. Students will record observations in a daily journal, conduct a project- related to their work at the institution and write a formal paper describing their work and the institution. Students meet on a regular basis with faculty for guidance and on-going assessment. Final evaluation of faculty advisor will include an evaluation by the student’s on-site supervisor. Prior to registration for this course, the student must fill out an application and obtain the permission of a faculty supervisor.
3 credits

SOC 3001/ ENV 3021: Human Ecology
This course draws strongly on anthropology and ecology, as well as a variety of other disciplines, in order to study humans and human societies from ecological perspectives. We will examine both the benefits and difficulties associated with the application of ecological concepts to humans. Topics include human adaptation; continuity and change in human ecosystems; human epidemiology and infectious disease; and the role of symbolic cognition, politics and power, and globalization as they affect human ecosystems.
3 credits

SOC 3002: Social Theory
This course will cover the classical theorists, including Weber, Marx, Durkheim, Simmel, Cooley, and others. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3003: Independent Study in Sociology/Anthropology II
In this course, students conduct independent reading, research, or other projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor. They must complete the Independent Study application form before registering. Independent studies are necessarily subject to availability of a faculty mentor.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
3-4 credits

SOC 3009: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization
This course draws on social theory to investigate the cultural dimensions of globalization (the increasing transnational flow of capital, people, commodities, ideas, and ideologies). We will consider: definitions of globalization, its historical roots, the role of capitalism, diasporas, commodity chain analysis, cultural imperialism, identity and hybridity, ethnonationalism, hegemony and resistance, globalization and localization, and homogeneity versus fragmentation. We will use cultural anthropology in order to focus on how these trends and issues affect real people living real lives throughout the world. Student participation is essential.
Prerequisite: SOC 1002 Cultural Anthropology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3010: Social Research I
This course provides an introduction to research design, measurement, and analysis including: survey and observational designs, operational definitions, reliability, validity, sampling, sampling distributions and confidence intervals, statistics of central tendency and variability, uses of the normal distribution and interpretation of other statistical distributions such as t, c2, and r. Basic elements of hypothesis testing will be studied. Students will use SPSS to analyze data sets and learn to present and interpret data in graphic form.
Prerequisite: ELA math completion or Level 4 math placement or permission of instructor.
4 credits

SOC 3011: Anthropology of Contemporary China
China is currently experiencing fascinating and complex changes. A socialist economy is transforming into a largely capitalistic one, affecting all levels of Chinese society. At the same time, deep cultural traditions and values are increasingly interacting with global forces in ways that are transforming peoples’ lives. In this course, we will therefore use the lens of cultural anthropology to examine how social and economic forces are effecting peoples’ everyday lives, including wealth and class, family and work life, internal migration, religious practice, gender roles and sexuality, national and ethnic identity, environmental issues, and ideologies of development and modernization. Students are expected to contribute actively through discussion, writing, and at least one presentation.
3 credits

SOC 3012: Social Research II
The second course in a two semester sequence, this course provides opportunities for student generated research projects which involve significant library research, the collection of data, and the production of a journal style paper in APA format. Experimentation, content analysis, and research ethics will be studied. Students will gain experience in the analysis of multivariate problems using correlation, regression, and analysis of variance with post hoc determinations. Students will use SPSS to analyze data sets and present summaries in graphic form.
Prerequisite: SOC 3010 Social Research I.
4 credits

SOC 3013: Third World Developments
This course examines recent international events with an emphasis upon Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. It includes a contrast among Russian, Chinese, and Latin American communism as well as a contrast between Japanese and American capitalism. Prerequisite: Two SOC courses or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3015: Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. The topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor.
Permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3016: Asian Art
The course represents an overview, across the ages, of how various oriental religions and cultures transformed their artistic impulses into distinctive forms of aesthetic expression. The course will explore not only painting, but also sculpture, architecture, and everyday (antique) objects. Historical, sociological, and anthropological insights will be applied to interpret common and divergent styles of art.
Prerequisites: at least one course in Sociology/Anthropology, Art, or Asian Studies, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3021: Social and Psychological Dimensions of Leisure
This course primarily examines the significance of play, recreation, and leisure throughout the life cycle relative to the individual’s attitudes, values, behaviors, and use of resources. Theories of social psychology pertinent to individuals in the recreation field are explored through the examination of applicable leisure practices and research.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

SOC/ELA 3022: Ethnoecology
Ethnoecology, with theoretical roots in cognitive science and environmental anthropology, investigates local, folk systems of knowledge pertaining to plants, animals, and ecological dynamics. Since the 1950s, ethnoecological case-studies around the world have demonstrated the internal coherence, complexity, and adaptiveness of indigenous systems of classification. While this is still a central goal, contemporary ethnoecologists also apply their findings to goals such as the conservation of biological diversity, rural development, sustainable use of common property resources, and negotiation of intellectual property rights. Ethnoecology has therefore also become politicized: we are now interested in how “native” systems of knowledge and behavior are embedded in systems of unequal distribution, access and power.

In this course, students will learn about the theoretical underpinnings and development of approaches to ethnoecology; become acquainted with case-studies from the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Australia; and become trained in basic ethnoecological methods and use them to produce a significant research project and present your findings.
3 credits

SOC 3023: Social Psychology
An examination of individual and group responses to social influence. Emphasis is on major theories, research methods, and current research topics in social psychology. This course may also be taken as Psychology 3023.
Prerequisites: SOC 1011 Introduction to Sociology or one 2000 level SOC or PSY course.
3 credits

SOC 3025: Ethnographic Field Methods
This is a hands-on methodology course for students interested in conducting ethnographic fieldwork, or the first-hand study of people in their everyday, cultural settings. We will explore critically the purposes, issues, ethics, and techniques of ethnographic fieldwork methodology through readings on fieldwork methods and by “doing ethnography.” Students will learn about research design, gathering data, analyzing data, and how to write up their conclusions. Throughout the course students will conduct a series of fieldwork exercises as they work toward completion of a longer, final ethnography.
Prerequisite: SOC 1002 Cultural Anthropology or permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3032: Criminology
This course deals with the various aspects of crime and delinquency as well as the American criminal justice system. It will attempt to explain why people commit crimes, why society formulates laws, and how law breakers are dealt with. Some alternate solutions to the problems of crime will be considered.
Prerequisite: one SOC course or ELA 1023 Contemporary Social Issues or permission of instructor.
3 credits

SOC 3063: Independent Research I
With the assistance and advice of a faculty mentor, the student will investigate a topic or issue of particular interest using one of the methods in social research: e.g., survey, content analysis, experiment. The results of the research will be presented in a formal paper in the style of a journal article.
Prerequisite: PSY 3014/ SOC 3012 Social Research II or SOC 3025 Ethnographic Field Methods and permission of the instructor.
3 credits

SOC 4000: Practicum II
This course involves 60 hours of participation and observation in an off -campus institutional setting under close faculty supervision. Students will record observations in a daily journal, conduct a project related to their work at the institution and write a formal paper describing their work and the institution. Students meet on a regular basis with faculty for guidance and on-going assessment. Final evaluation by faculty advisor will include an evaluation by the student’s on-site supervisor. Prior to registration for this course, the student must fill out an application form and obtain the permission of a faculty supervisor.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
3 credits

SOC 4003: Independent Research II
With the assistance and advice of a faculty mentor, the student will investigate a topic or issue of particular interest using one of the methods in social research: e.g., survey, content analysis, and experiment. The results of the research will be presented in a formal paper in the style of a journal article.
Prerequisite: SOC 3012 Social Research II or SOC 3025 Ethnographic Field Methods and permission of the instructor.
3 credits

SOC 4013: Senior Seminar
This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study, analysis, and discussion of issues in sociology and anthropology which are of special interest to students and faculty. It may be taken more than once for credit as the topic changes each year. It may also be taken by non-majors only with permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing.
3 credits

SOC 4015: Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology
This course will be offered upon sufficient demand provided an instructor is available. The topics covered will vary according to the preferences of students and instructor. This course will satisfy the requirement of course electives within the Division at the 4000 level. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
3 credits



SPA (top)

SPA 1001-1002: Beginning Spanish
This course covers beginning reading and writing skills, spoken language, basic verb structure, vocabulary and some cultural study through language. Not open to native speakers, this class assumes no previous knowledge of Spanish.
3 credits for each course

SPA 2001: Intermediate Spanish
This course is designed to build students’ Spanish skills in all areas – reading, writing, speaking and listening. We will cover essential grammatical concepts, from the basic to the more complex, using engaging and interactive classroom activities that encourage authentic communication. We will be watching and discussing short films that correspond to each textbook chapter, reading literature from a number of Latin American countries, and listening to music in Spanish to expand students’ exposure to Spanish beyond the classroom. Exposure to various aspects of Latin American and Spanish culture will be an essential part of the class. Prerequisites: SPA 1001 Beginning Spanish I and SPA 1002 Beginning Spanish II or permission of instructor.
3 credits

SPA 2020: Conversational Spanish
This course will emphasize oral communication, listening comprehension and the development of an understanding and appreciation of the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Students will practice vocabulary and expressions appropriate to a variety of situations they might encounter while traveling or studying in the Spanish-speaking world, and will increase their proficiency in the use of grammatical concepts learned in previous courses. They will become familiar with the geography of Spain and Latin America, and will delve into the various cultures of the regions through food, music and mass media. Each student will choose one Spanish-speaking country as his/her focus for the semester and will be responsible for several oral presentations that explore different aspects of that country. The course will include a limited grammar review and opportunities to develop reading and writing skills in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPA 1001 Beginning Spanish I and SPA 1002 Beginning Spanish II, or permission of instructor.
3 credits



UTA (top)

UTA 3000: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum
This practicum is intended for students who excelled in a course or who bring extensive, related, prior education or experience to a particular class. It furthers student knowledge of a subject beyond initial exposure and competence by helping a faculty member teach a course on that subject. It also provides a limited apprenticeship in the design and implementation of a college course. This course is repeatable when different courses are covered. Students must have taken the course in which they plan to UTA and may only be a UTA for up to 10 credits.
1-10 credits



WST (top)

WST/SOC 2005: Women’s Studies
Women’s Studies uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of women and their place in society. The course explores the meaning of sex and gender, gender role socialization, issues regarding women’s role and treatment in society, and the consequences for women.
3 credits

WST/SOC 2013: Women Across Cultures
This course focuses on the status of women in various cultures, their needs and problems, priorities and potential. Different perspectives applicable to women’s lives and experiences are covered. Special emphasis is given to women in non-Western societies.
3 credits

WST 3015: Special Topics in Women’s Studies
Instructors and students delve into a specific topic related to women in this course. It is intended to further students’ knowledge and understanding about the female experience and the place of women in the world. It is open to all areas of inquiry and will be offered as often as demand and conditions prevail.
3 credits

WST/PHI3030: Feminist Philosophy
The course is a survey of the perspectives and issues of feminist and gender theory in philosophy, including ethics, social-political theory, ecofeminism, metaphysics, religion, philosophy of science, aesthetics and theories of knowledge. Topics will include historical and contemporary philosophic theories by and about women, as well as social and political issues concerning a plurality of gendered perspectives.
3 credits

WST/PSY 4022: Psychology & Gender
This course will facilitate an examination of gender as it exists in our lives, as a cultural construct having profound psycho-social implications and as an object of theoretical discourse. By means of a close study of primary texts, attention will be given to historical transformations of concepts of gender in psychology since Freud. Prerequisite: PSY 2034 Theories of Personality or permission of instructor.
3 credits

© 2014 Green Mountain College | One Brennan Circle | Poultney, Vermont 05764 | 800-776-6675 | MyGMC Login | Email Login