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Course Descriptions

EDU 1000: Introduction to Environmental Education
This course is an introduction to the field of environmental education (EE). Students will examine what EE is, how it has evolved, and future trends in the field. Research, theories, resources, and careers will be introduced. Students will have opportunities to observe and interact with EE professionals.
3 credits

EDU 1062: Teacher as Decision Maker
This introductory course examines some of the multitude of decisions teachers consciously make, and consciously or unconsciously don’t make, affecting students’ lives. These decisions will be explored within the larger social context in which they occur. Also, a variety of techniques and strategies used by PreK-12 teachers will be introduced and critically examined. Required of all education majors.
3 credits

EDU 1200: Praxis
This course is a lab designed to refresh students’ abilities in math, reading, and writing in preparation for the Praxis I test required of teacher candidates by the state of Vermont. Instruction proceeds by addressing each skill area in turn and will be modified to meet student needs. The course culminates in all students taking Praxis I. Students need to pass the Praxis I test in order to student teach and to complete any of the programs leading to a recommendation for licensure.
0 credit

EDU 2000: Early Field Experience
This course offers 40 hours of involvement in an elementary, secondary, or special education setting appropriate to the student's career goal in education. This field-based course requires students to volunteer forty hours in a classroom or other educational setting. Working with a cooperating host teacher, students observe and participate in daily classroom activities and duties. Students may assist in preparing lesson plans or materials, and work with students one-on-one, in small groups, or in whole class activities. Involvement will vary depending on individual experience and will be arranged during meetings with the cooperating teacher. The course meets as a group only once at the start of the semester to discuss the syllabus and expectations for student work in schools. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker or permission of instructor.
1 credit

EDU 2018 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence to Adulthood
This course traces the development of the human being from the onset of adolescence to its completion in the late teen years. Theories regarding the development of prosocial and antisocial behaviors, gender identity, depression and suicide, effects of puberty, bullying, educational and vocational choices and media influences are discussed. Work of such theorists as Erikson, Baumrind, Klaczynski and others are considered.
3 credits

EDU 2019: The Exceptional Child
This course discusses the major categories of exceptionality which the practicing special education teacher will encounter. These include cognitive disabilities, autism, learning disabilities, behavioral/emotional disorders and physical disabilities. Consideration will be given to legal bases for the education of these children, including Federal court decisions and legislation. Students will be grounded in understanding procedures for educating exceptional children, such as the creation of the IEP, safeguarding of rights, and so on.
3 credits

EDU 2021: Language and Literacy I
This course introduces a research to practice model for teaching literacy to elementary age children. A specific focus is placed on current scientifically-based methods of teaching literacy as identified by the National Reading Panel and subsequent national and international research efforts. A heavy emphasis is put on the importance of varying domains of phonology (phonemic awareness especially), and other crucial language systems and patterns upon which proficient reading and spelling depends. A plethora of dynamic strategies for teaching spelling, writing, reading fluency, and reading comprehension are introduced in this course. Understanding of foundational skills of the English language will support reading instruction. Students work heavily with the Vermont Framework Standards as well as the Common CORE standards. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 3032-Language and Literacy II.
3 credits

EDU 2031: Secondary Education Methods I
This course focuses on specific techniques to enhance or develop reading and writing skills with multiple forms of text, and on assessment practices which allow the teacher to identify strengths and weaknesses in the material, in student skills, and in the teacher’s own practice. In addition, this course reviews learning theory and general pedagogical techniques and provides an opportunity for practice. This course also requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. This course is required of all Secondary Education candidates and Art Prek-12 candidates. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2000 Early Field Experience, or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3001: Special Topics in Education
This is an advanced readings or research seminar on issues, theories, and/or methods of Education. Topics vary and the course may be repeated for credit if the topic changes.
3 credits

EDU 3002: Literature Across the Curriculum
Designed to introduce and explore a wide variety of children’s literature ranging from picture books to young adult selections, EDU 3002 is for prospective teachers and others interested in working with children in classroom, service learning, or place-based educational settings. The main goals of this course are to introduce students to examples of outstanding children’s and young adult literature, explore methods that enhance student understanding and enjoyment of books and reading, and to facilitate growth as an advocate, proponent, and teacher of reading and literature. Long time favorites, as well as exciting new titles will be read, reviewed, analyzed, discussed and evaluated. An emphasis on vocabulary and reading comprehension will also be addressed. Another critical component of the course is to facilitate the development of a personal philosophy about the value of children’s/young adult literature across the curriculum, as well as the exploration of new creative classroom methodologies.
3 credits

EDU/CMJ 3012Environmental Interpretation and Communication
This course will explore the theories, principles, and techniques of interpreting cultural, historical, and natural resources. The course will explore relevant educational, social, psychological, and philosophical theories relevant to interpretive learning and communication. Students will synthesize and apply interpretation theories and methods, refine interpretive communication and publishing skills, and undertake independent research while working on service learning project(s).
3 credits

EDU/PHI 3013: Philosophy of Education
This course explores the fundamental question of the place of public education in a liberal democracy. The goal is for students to draw on important philosophical ideas to construct a carefully reasoned position on public education. Authors and arguments from a range of philosophical traditions will be applied to case studies of contemporary educational practices, policies, and proposed reforms. Skills of analysis will be developed through written and oral exercises. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

EDU 3014: Environmental Education: Placed-Based Education
This course will examine place-based education as a means of achieving local ecological and cultural sustainability. By experientially learning about the local past, current, and future human and non-human communities, students will have opportunities to engage in critical inquiry. Additionally, students will learn techniques for exploring and extending local knowledge, and will examine many of the educational, legal, ethical, and technical issues involved in local documentation and publishing projects. Students will apply place-based education theory and methods and complete independent research while participating in place-based education service learning project(s).
3 credits

EDU/HIS 3015: History of Education
Aristotle said that the central task of government is to look after the education of youth. This course examines the ways in which the peoples of the United States have wrestled with that dictum since passing the first education law in 1647. Readings will change from semester to semester depending upon whether the central focus is curriculum–what should be taught to whom, how, and why; or the development and evolution of the public school system. Students will gain a critical understanding of the forces that created the public school in its current form and the tensions which underlie current policy issues. Meets the foundations requirement for all education programs.
3 credits

EDU 3021: Curriculum and Instruction for Mild to Moderate Disabilities
This course instructs the student how to develop curricula and instructional strategies for students having mild to moderate disabilities, including cognitive disabilities, learning disabilities, attention disorders and behavioral disorders. Students will learn the relevance of legislation such as I.D.E.A., Act 230 and 504 to curriculum, Response to Intervention and IEP development. Experiences are provided in assessment, task analysis and lesson planning for students with special needs. Students learn to create developmentally appropriate IEPs, lesson plans and instructional units that meet Vermont state standards and the Common Core. This course is required for the special education endorsement. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3032: Language and Literacy II
This course is designed to give participants in depth knowledge of phonetics, phonology, orthography, and morphology which are the building blocks for effective teaching of word recognition, vocabulary, and spelling. Various methodologies for teaching vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension will be included in this course, as well as story grammar and approaches to effectively teach writing. Students will learn strategies for assessment and instructional intervention and will work closely with the Vermont Frameworks as well as the Common Core Standards. The course is a continuation of topics undertaken in Language & Literacy I, delving deeper into study of sophisticated linguistic systems. Prerequisites: EDU 2021 Language & Literacy I.
3 credits

EDU 3034: Language Development and Disorders
This course explores components of typical and atypical language development, and will visit behavioral manifestations associated with language disorders and their influence on academic functioning. Written language skills and their relationship to educational instruction will be stressed. The communication disorders of childhood and adolescence are associated with personal, social, academic, and life-long challenges. This course will consider these disorders by presenting various linguistic domains and by differentiating between speech and language disorders, especially manifested during the school years. Among other in-depth assignments, students will complete an intensive language evaluation for a child under the age of five years old noting developmental landmarks as identified throughout the course. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU 3070: Elementary Social Studies Methods
This course is designed to introduce content and methods for teaching Social Studies to elementary students. Hands-on experiences will help familiarize the prospective teacher with resources, texts, and current educational trends in the area of social studies. Topics include theory, assessment, and an overview of content and standards included in the elementary Social Studies curriculum. The primary focus is the development of a personal philosophy of teaching elementary Social Studies, as well as the creation and practice of new creative classroom methodologies that will enable excellent, effective teaching of elementary Social Studies. The course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities as well as the Common Core Standards.
3 credits

EDU 3071: Elementary Math Methods
This course is designed to introduce content and methods for teaching mathematics to elementary students. Methods of teaching mathematics will be taught through hands-on discovery of measurement, statistics, geometry, patterns and functions, number, and arithmetic concepts, as well as technological applications. Additional topics include theory, assessment, and an overview of content included in the elementary mathematics curriculum. The primary focus is classroom methodologies that value conceptual understanding rather than procedural computation alone so that students will develop a PUMC (profound understanding of mathematical concepts) through a problem solving approach. Students will learn the underpinnings of mathematical concepts which will enable them to better understand common errors that children make as well as will enable excellent, effective teaching of elementary mathematics. The course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities as well as the Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker and a minimum of completion of CLC math.
3 credits

EDU 3072: Elementary Science Methods
Methods of teaching aspects of physical, life, health, and earth science found in the elementary school curriculum will be taught through a discovery based scientific inquiry process. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities. Prerequisites: A physical, earth, or biological science course or permission of instructor. Lab fee may apply.
3 credits

EDU 3100: Observation Practicum
By arrangement, candidates will spend a minimum of 60 hours in a classroom/school setting specific to their area of licensure, in which they will also be doing their student teaching (if appropriate). The primary goal is to observe and collect data and evidence needed to prepare entries needed for the Level I Licensure Portfolio for the State of Vermont (or the equivalent for Degree Track candidates). Candidates are to collect information about the school, its culture, the classroom(s) in which they are immersed, and the students being taught. This course will take place the semester before student teaching (Licensure Track) or by arrangement with the candidate’s Education advisor (Degree Track). Prerequisite: EDU 2000 Early Field Experience.
4 credits

EDU 4012: Teaching Methods in Secondary Science
This course is designed to explore and develop the teacher’s role in the teaching of science in the secondary classroom. This course will teach the student to design lessons and thematic units that meet national and state standards and use technology to promote learning. Additionally, while students who take this course are biology majors, it is recognized that they will be certified to teach materials in the other sciences. These may include physics, chemistry and earth science. A broad emphasis on the principles of science education, therefore, are presented in order to prepare students for this expanded role.
4 credits

EDU 4022: Assessment in Special Education
An in-depth, advanced study of the concepts of validity, reliability and statistical properties of tests initially covered in Education 3021. Practice in the administration, analysis and interpretation of commonly used educational tests and other assessment techniques is combined with developing comprehensive IEPs and learning how they assess proficiency in the Common Core. Projects are assigned and there is a field component to the course. This course is required for the special education endorsement. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker or permission of the instructor.
3 credits

EDU/PSY 4031: Assessment and Management of Behavior
The course includes presentation and intensive discussion of learning approaches based on respondent and operant conditioning paradigms in classroom and clinic venues. Legal and ethical issues pertaining to behavior modification techniques, including IEP development, permissible and prohibited techniques of behavior modification and case management are covered. Consideration is given to such topics as token economies, modeling, desensitization, punishment and approaches to behavioral problems. Required of all education majors. Prerequisite: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision Maker.
3 credits

BIO/EDU 4035: Content for Secondary Science Teachers
This course provides a content-rich learning experience for students who wish to become certified as science teachers in the secondary schools of Vermont. This content is complementary to that studied in the wide range of required courses in GMC’s science teaching sequence. A prerequisite for this course is EDU 4012, which emphasizes the development of a broad understanding of diverse methods in the teaching of science. EDU/BIO 4035 provides content focusing on physics and earth/space science. Its content is based on the Vermont State Board of Education Manual of Rules and Practices and the National Science Education Standards (NSES) for secondary science teachers.
4 credits

EDU 4053: Environmental Education: Practicum
This course is an opportunity for students to participate in environmental education fieldwork. Students will be required to complete a 120-hour work experience under the direction of a qualified environmental education professional. Written work related to this experience will be required. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
3 credits

EDU 4081: Secondary Education Methods, History and English
This course reviews and reinforces competencies gained from prior education courses while focusing on synthesizing all relevant skills and knowledge into a coherent and workable practice. The goal is to develop a conscience of craft and to prepare people to student teach in the following semester. This is a demanding, hands-on course conducted seminar style. While the approach is cross-disciplinary, there are discipline-specific components. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2031 Secondary Methods I or permission of instructor.
4 credits

EDU 4082: Art Methods
This course reviews and reinforces competencies gained from prior education courses while focusing on synthesizing all relevant skills and knowledge into a coherent and workable practice. The goal is to develop a conscience of craft and to prepare people to student teach in the following semester. This is a demanding, hands-on course conducted seminar style. While the approach is cross-disciplinary, there are discipline-specific components. Art Methods covers PreK-12 teaching contexts. This course requires students to know and apply Vermont’s Grade Expectations and/or The Common Core Standards. Prerequisites: EDU 1062 Teacher as Decision-Maker, EDU 2000 Early Field Experience, EDU 2031 Secondary Methods I, or permission of the instructor.
4 credits

EDU 4085: Student Teaching
This is a semester of full-time student teaching and an accompanying seminar done in the senior year by all candidates seeking teacher licensure. A student teaching experience totaling 15 weeks is arranged within the immediate geographical area of the College (if appropriate). Student teachers are supervised by a member of the Education Department at least once every 10 days. Transportation to the site is the responsibility of the student. Art candidates student teach for 7/8 weeks in grades preK-6 and 7/8 weeks in grades 7-12. Special Education students teach for 7/8 weeks in a special education placement and 7/8 weeks in an elementary classroom. All other candidates student teach in one setting. Candidates have all the duties and must conform to all the expectations of a regular classroom teacher. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required education courses; senior standing; meeting GPA requirements; passing Praxis I and II; and permission of the Education Department. Application for student teaching must be made to the Education Department by the middle of the semester prior to the year of student teaching. In order to license, candidates must receive a grade of B or higher in both EDU 4085 and EDU 4086.
9 credits

EDU 4086: Student Teaching Seminar
This is the 3-credit portion of the student teaching experience in which student teachers participate in a weekly seminar which guides them through the process of compiling and completing their Level I Licensure Portfolio for the state of Vermont, a requirement for licensure. Students will also focus on and complete assignments in the areas of classroom management, lesson planning, and other related areas. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required education courses; senior standing; meeting GPA requirements; passing Praxis I and Praxis II; and permission of the Education Department. Application for student teaching must be made by the middle of the semester prior to the year of student teaching. In order to license, candidates must receive a grade of B or higher in both EDU 4085 and EDU 4086.
3 credits.

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